Keeping It ‘Frozen,’ but Still Fresh

August 15, 2017

UNH alumna Jennifer Lee ’92 (English) is adapting her Oscar-winning movie “Frozen” for the Big Apple. The show will open in the spring of 2018.

Read the New York Times article: Disney’s Challenge: Keeping It ‘Frozen,’ but Still Fresh


Sociology Undergrads Publish New Work

August 9, 2017

The 2017 edition of Perspectives, the UNH online undergraduate journal in sociology, is now available. A student editorial team worked with 11 fellow students to craft their papers into publishable articles for inclusion in this year’s edition.

Articles tackle topics such as racial bias, suicide and mental health, prescription stimulant use and how students’ paid jobs impact academic outcomes.

“We were overwhelmingly impressed and pleased at the high number of submissions we received from undergrads this year,” wrote the editors in their introduction. “It’s truly incredible that so many students went the extra mile to submit these papers, particularly those who worked tirelessly to complete their final year here at UNH prior to stepping out into the post-college world.”

Read the latest edition.


Passing: David L. Larson

July 31, 2017

photo of David Larson on boat

David L. Larson, professor emeritus of political science, passed away on July 26, 2017. He served the Department of Political Science and the University of New Hampshire from 1965 to 1996.

Read his obituary.

Visiting hours will be held on Saturday, August 5th from 2 – 4 p.m. at Kent & Pelczar Funeral Home, 77 Exeter Street, Newmarket, NH. A private burial will be held at a later date at the Durham cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Cocheco Valley Humane Society, 262 County Farm Rd, Dover, NH 03820.


To address the Anthropocene, engage the liberal arts

July 20, 2017

journal cover with globe

Heidi Bostic, dean of the College of Liberal Arts, and Meghan Howey, associate professor of anthropology, have teamed up to write an article for the journal Anthropocene. They argue for early and frequent collaboration between the geosciences and liberal arts disciplines when trying to understand our current era of human geologic impact, called the anthropocene. Interdisciplinarity is key to successfully addressing the grand challenges of our era, which include sea-level rise, food insecurity, and global health issues, among others.

The full text of the article is available for a limited time.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE: Anthropocene


UNH Research Finds Majority of Americans Trust NASA on Climate Change

June 13, 2017

bar graph
Article Source: UNH Media Relations

Seventy-three percent of Americans trust science agencies like NASA for information about climate change, according to new research released by the Carsey School of Public Policy at UNH. This includes a substantial majority within every political group.

In addition, a follow-up survey by the researchers found more than 80 percent of survey respondents – again including majorities in all political groups – favor continuing or expanding NASA’s Earth observations programs rather than cutting them.

“NASA and scientists in general know they face challenges in communicating the results, reasoning and importance of their work to the public,” the researchers said. “That is true now more than ever, as the scientific community interacts with a Trump administration that has been widely dismissive of science. As NASA scientists continue to carry out and communicate Earth observations, efforts to curtail their work will not find a sympathetic public, even among partisans.”

Original data was collected for the nationwide Polar, Environment and Sciences (POLES) survey conducted just after the election and for a statewide follow-up survey in May. Similarly, high trust in NASA climate science was found on a separate survey conducted last August. The full report can be found here: https://carsey.unh.edu/publication/eyes-earth

The research was conducted by Lawrence Hamilton, UNH professor of sociology and senior Carsey fellow; Jessica Brunacini, assistant director of the Polar Learning and Responding (PoLAR) Climate Change Education Partnership at the Earth Institute of Columbia University; and Stephanie Pfirman, Hirschorn professor of environmental sciences at Barnard College, Columbia University, and director of PoLAR.


The (603) Challenge

June 2, 2017

Cultivating thinkers, creators and doers.

As we face the grand challenges of our time, the liberal arts are more essential than ever. Your gift enables students and faculty to tackle the world’s pressing problems by supporting experiential learning, new employer partnerships and career pathways, innovative and interdisciplinary programs, and faculty research and creativity. Thank you for being part of the solution.

GIVE HERE JUNE 3-9

Respond early at unh.edu/603 to take advantage of matching funds. Be sure to designate your gift for the College of Liberal Arts or your favorite COLA program.


COLA Staff Members Win UNH Presidential Awards of Excellence

May 17, 2017
photos of Chris Clement and 4 award winners

(L to R) Carla Cannizzaro, Amanda Stone, Marlene Brooks, Chris Clement and Avary Thorne

Hundreds of UNH employees were recognized for their talents and dedication during a staff recognition ceremony May 5 in the MUB’s Granite State Room. In addition, five staff members were awarded the university’s highest staff honor — the Presidential Award of Excellence. Among the five were two staff members from the College of Liberal Arts: Carla Cannizzaro of the Department of English and Avary Thorne of the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

“These recipients are the human faces behind our success across UNH,” said Christopher Clement, vice president for finance and administration. “They demonstrate excellence every day.”

University community members nominate colleagues for the Presidential Award of Excellence. A committee of judges selects five nominees whose outstanding work has contributed to the goals of the UNH Strategic Plan to receive the award.

Read the citations that Clement read about Cannizzaro and Thorne.

This post was edited from a longer story in UNH Today.


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