COLA Staff Members Win UNH Presidential Awards of Excellence

May 17, 2017
photos of Chris Clement and 4 award winners

(L to R) Carla Cannizzaro, Amanda Stone, Marlene Brooks, Chris Clement and Avary Thorne

Hundreds of UNH employees were recognized for their talents and dedication during a staff recognition ceremony May 5 in the MUB’s Granite State Room. In addition, five staff members were awarded the university’s highest staff honor — the Presidential Award of Excellence. Among the five were two staff members from the College of Liberal Arts: Carla Cannizzaro of the Department of English and Avary Thorne of the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

“These recipients are the human faces behind our success across UNH,” said Christopher Clement, vice president for finance and administration. “They demonstrate excellence every day.”

University community members nominate colleagues for the Presidential Award of Excellence. A committee of judges selects five nominees whose outstanding work has contributed to the goals of the UNH Strategic Plan to receive the award.

Read the citations that Clement read about Cannizzaro and Thorne.

This post was edited from a longer story in UNH Today.


Career Minded

May 16, 2017

photo of Carrington Cazeau

Talk about plum assignments: When Boston native Carrington Cazeau ’17 went to Washington, D.C., for an internship with the U.S. Marshals Service, he was one of only four assigned to the Superior Court of the District of Columbia. “Not many people get to work there,” says Cazeau, who is planning a career in federal law enforcement. With majors in psychology and justice studies, he’ll graduate from the UNH College of Liberal Arts with a B.A. degree later this month.

Watch the video of Carrington’s journey:

Written by UNH Communications and Public Affairs  |  Photographer: Jeremy Gasowski  |  Videographer: Scott Ripley


Scholarships Awarded for Study Abroad in Italy

May 4, 2017
Allison Hoey

Allison Hoey

Two students have received $4,000 scholarships from the COLA Fund for Study in Italy that will enable them to study abroad in programs of their choice in Italy.

Allison Hoey of Pelham, N.H., has always had a passion and interest in painting, but once she discovered art history, she realized that knowledge of history and context can have a big influence on an artist’s work. Currently a studio art major, she’s decided to pursue both a B.F.A. in painting and an art history major. Next she wants to experience art and its history first-hand in Italy. Hoey plans to study abroad in the spring 2018 semester and is currently considering her options, trying to decide among two institutions in Florence and one in Verona.

“Being surrounded by the work of influential artists will inspire my own work throughout the rest of my undergraduate career and beyond,” says Hoey.

History major Kelly Sheehan of Brockton, Mass., has loved history for as long as she can remember. It was in a history class in high school that she learned about the Renaissance, from whence sprang her second love: Italy and all things Italian. Now in her sixth semester of Italian at UNH, she couldn’t be happier:  except maybe if she were actually in Italy. Thanks to this scholarship, Sheehan will achieve that goal. She will attend the UNH-managed program on nutrition and culture in Ascoli Piceno, Italy, in summer 2017.

“To be able to stand and look at the things I have spent so long studying and learning about is surreal to me,” says Sheehan. “…I will be able to see firsthand some of the amazing monuments, statues and museums I have always dreamt of.”

The COLA Fund for Study in Italy supports UNH COLA students with a demonstrated interest in art, art history and Italian language who plan to study abroad in Italy. Awards are made to one or more students each spring. The Fund is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad and made possible through the generosity of a donor.


Passing: John E. Limber

May 2, 2017
photo of John E. Limber

John E. Limber

John E. Limber, associate professor emeritus of psychology, passed away on April 26, 2017. A memorial service will be held on May 26, 2017 at 5 p.m. at Three Chimneys Inn in Durham.

On Wednesday, April 26, John Edward Limber died peacefully at his home in Durham, N.H., surrounded by his daughters, Kristin and Alexandra McGraw.

Born on Chicago’s South Side, John earned his undergraduate and honors graduate degrees at the University of Illinois, and was forever tied to the hapless Fighting Illini football and basketball teams. A win, at least every now and then, made John a happy member of Illini Nation.

In 1971, following post-doctoral work in psycholinguistics at Wesleyan University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, John became a member of the Department of Psychology of the University of New Hampshire, where he continued to teach undergraduate and graduate students and supervise their research until his retirement in 2009.

His graduate students became his lifelong friends and, especially in his later years, reminded him of the powerful influence he had on them, personally and professionally. A common refrain was that he taught, and led, by example.

John was also an innovator. At the beginning of each class and then periodically throughout the semester, he warned students that while all views were welcome, they needed to be data-based and cogently argued. He never tolerated, he said, “B.S.” He brought out a rubber stamp and a red ink pad and illustrated what he would add, as needed, to papers turned into him. Note: the rubber stamp did not use the abbreviation. Neither did John. Any number of students can testify that this was not an idle threat, but they can also testify that it was always done with charm and flair, to move their thinking along.

John’s views were not always taken as gospel by friends. For decades, John was an active member of the Psyclones — the slow-pitch softball team fielded by members of the psychology department. John was the team’s main pitcher, and for decades he insisted he was able to throw a slow-pitch curve ball. Knowledgeable people (including a former minor league major baseball pitcher) denied the very possibility of such a pitch. But John scoffed at skeptics, as he explained the physics of why the ball had to curve when released it just so!

John was a charter member of the “Applied Probability Group” in Durham — otherwise known as the monthly poker game. John was often the big winner of the night and at the last meeting he attended just a couple of months ago, he maintained his winning style.

John Limber was kind, nurturing, smart and pragmatic. His was a life well lived. At John’s core was his love of family. In the view of family and friends, John always found (and gave) the essentials: love, perspective, humor and kindness.

A memorial service to honor John’s life will be held at 5 p.m., May 26, 2017 at Three Chimneys Inn in Durham. His family and friends request that if you attend, you come with a story about John to share with the group. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in John’s name to a charity of your choice.

—Edited from a longer piece written by the Limber family


Simic Awarded International Poetry Festival’s Golden Wreath

April 25, 2017

photo of Charles Simic

Charles Simic, professor emeritus of English, has been named the 2017 Golden Wreath award winner of Struga Poetry Evenings.

Struga Poetry Evenings is an international poetry festival held every August in Struga, Macedonia since 1962. Over 5,000 poets, book reviewers, theoreticians, publishers and literature promoters from over 100 countries and all continents have taken part in the festival since its inception. During the event, the Golden Wreath award is given to an outstanding poet for her or his body of work.

The managing board of Struga Poetry Evenings chose Simic’s work for its “original poetic voice that through a surrealistic experience, gradually evolves as a distinctive observer of the modern, with strong moral and philosophical questions; extremely clear, serious but fun at the same time. This award values his outstanding and proven mastery in the art of poetry, which is a passionate and lucid testimony of modern time, intriguing, provocative, shocking, meditative, full of insights of ironic humor.”

“I was delighted to hear that I’m to be awarded The Golden Wreath Award…,” said Simic, as reported in Versopolis, a European publication that reviews poetry, books and culture. “A number of past winners were my friends and I know how deeply honored they were to receive this award and so am I today. The list of your past recipients is so distinguished that I don’t know of another poetry prize anywhere in the world that can equal it. I have fond memories of Struga Poetry Evenings in 1972 and my visit to Skopje afterwards and on another occasion in 1982. I look forward to meeting old friends and making new ones. Thank you all.”

Simic is widely recognized as one of the most visceral and unique poets writing today. His work has won numerous awards, among them the 1990 Pulitzer Prize, the MacArthur Foundation “genius grant,” the Griffin International Poetry Prize, and, simultaneously, the Wallace Stevens Award and appointment as U.S. Poet Laureate. He has published over twenty books of his own poetry, seven books of essays, a memoir, and numerous books of translations of French, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, and Slovenian poetry. Simic, who was born in Yugoslavia and immigrated to the United States as a teenager, taught English and creative writing for over thirty years at the University of New Hampshire.

The Golden Wreath award will be presented to Simic at this year’s festival, to be held August 23-28, 2017.


International Sculpture Day

April 24, 2017
photo of sculpture

Level Growth
glazed stoneware
Griffin Sinclair-Wingate

Students in Don Williams’ ceramics workshop contributed sculptures to the International Sculpture Day Exhibition at Bedrock Gardens in Lee, N.H. The pieces are on display alongside works by ten New Hampshire sculptors and set amid Bedrock Garden’s landscaped gardens, fields and woods. The exhibit opened on April 23 and runs through May 7, 2017. More information can be found at bedrockgardens.org.

“Making art for a class assignment is a very different experience than making art for a public exhibition,” says Williams. “Students taking part in this exhibition realized first-hand what these differences are while gaining real life experience. They became more invested in the project knowing their pieces would be judged by other participating professional artists and the public. Deadlines had to be met. Pieces required titles, prices, and artist statements.”

Williams and the students spent two days installing the sculptures in a steady forty-degree drizzle. But the sun shone for the opening, which over two hundred people attended.

International Sculpture Day is an event held worldwide to promote the creation and understanding of sculpture and its contribution to society. Hundreds of artists, organizations and institutions in over 20 countries celebrated the day this year.


2017 Trout Scholars Named

April 19, 2017
photos of Trout scholars

from left to right: Camden Warren, Sierra Mullin, Andrew Jablonski

Three students have been awarded B. Thomas Trout scholarships to study abroad this year. Andrew Jablonski and Camden Warren were each awarded $2,500 to study in Dijon, France, for the 2017 fall semester. Sierra Mullin was awarded $1,000 to study in the 6-week Costa Rica program in summer 2017.

A junior from Newmarket, N.H., Jablonski is pursuing French, German and international affairs majors. French has been his passion since seventh grade, says Jablonski, who has been so dedicated to the language that he even took two advanced French courses at UNH while still a senior in high school. The leg up in coursework is part of what’s allowed him to fit three majors into his schedule.

“I am honored to represent the Trout Scholarship while in France, standing for what he [B. Thomas Trout] believed in about international studies as being an important part of a college career,” says Jablonski, “and also allowing me to reflect and further my understanding of the complications of the world, and how we can improve them.”

This is Jablonski’s second time winning the Trout Scholarship. Last year, the award helped him study in Berlin, Germany.

Warren is a junior history and international affairs dual major from Alton, N.H. His career ambition is to work with people of different nationalities and backgrounds both here in the U.S. and abroad. In order to achieve this goal, he’s convinced he has to supplement his classroom learning with experience in a foreign country.

“I have had the chance in the past to travel to historical sites here in the United States and I can confidently say that going to the places where momentous events in history occurred gives a much deeper and complete understanding not only for what happened there, but how those events have shaped and continue to shape our world today,” says Warren.

Warren has also received the Foley Jackson Award from UNH’s Center for International Education and Global Engagement. The scholarship will further support his Dijon study.

Mullin, a freshman Spanish major from Nashua, N.H., hopes her experience in Costa Rica will hone her cultural and language skills, providing a “jump-start” to her academic career and, eventually, her job prospects. Plus the extra credits she’ll earn on the program may even allow her to fit in a second major before she graduates, she says.

“Bettering my Spanish will help me get closer to achieving a personal goal of becoming fluent in Spanish,” says Mullin, who also looks forward to expanding her worldview through connecting with other U.S. students, Costa Rican students, and her host family.

The late B. Thomas Trout was a professor of political science and an associate dean in the College of Liberal Arts. Throughout his career, Professor Trout actively and tirelessly promoted international studies as a vital part of the college curriculum. He was equally dedicated to the development of study abroad programs for undergraduates, convinced that expanding the range of international study opportunities for American college students was integral to their understanding of a complicated world.

In Professor Trout’s honor, the College of Liberal Arts established the B. Thomas Trout Scholars Fund, which supports academically outstanding College of Liberal Arts undergraduates, allowing them to participate in a UNH-managed study abroad program in the College.


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