UNH Political Scientist Publishes Two Books on United Nations

November 22, 2016

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Alynna Lyon, associate professor of political science, has written a book that explores the United States’ relationship to the United Nations. In “US Politics and the United Nations: A Tale of Dysfunctional Dynamics” (Lynne Rienner Publishers), Lyon examines the waxing and waning of U.S. support for the U.N., tracing events, actions and decisions from the end of World War I to the present.

U.S. Politics and the United Nations is available from the publisher and major online retailers.

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A second book, “The United Nations in the 21st Century” (5th edition, Westview Press), which Lyon co-authored with Karen A. Mingst and Margaret P. Karns, provides an introduction to the United Nations, exploring the historical, institutional and theoretical foundations of the U.N. This newest edition focuses on major trends since 2012, including changing power dynamics, increasing threats to peace and security, and the challenges of climate change.

“The United Nations in the 21st Century” is available from the publisher and major online retailers.


UNH Linguist Publishes 10th Book

November 21, 2016

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Rochelle Lieber, professor of English and linguistics, has released her 10th volume, “English Nouns: The Ecology of Nominalization” published by Cambridge University Press. The book explores English nominalizations, defined as complex nouns that are derived from verbs, adjectives and other nouns (for example, the noun “legalization” derives from the verb “legalize”).

Lieber uses data from Corpus of Contemporary American English to show that the syntactic patterns in which English nominalizations can be found and the range of possible readings they can express are very different from what has been claimed in past theoretical treatments. She argues that the relationship between form and meaning in the nominalization processes of English is virtually never one-to-one, but rather forms a complex web that can be likened to a derivational ecosystem.

“English Nouns: The Ecology of Nominalization” is available from the publisher and major online retailers.


New Book on Don Quixote Celebrates 400th Anniversary

November 18, 2016

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Carmen García de la Rasilla, associate professor of Spanish, and Jorge Abril Sánchez, lecturer in Spanish have teamed up to edit a new collection of essays on Miguel de Cervantes’ “Don Quixote,” celebrating the 400th anniversary of the publication of the novel’s second part.

“A Novel Without Boundaries: Sensing Don Quixote 400 Years Later,” published by Juan de la Cuesta, includes articles that examine “Don Quixote” in relation to major literary forms and genres such as novels of chivalry, the Alexandrian epic narrative and the genesis of detective fiction. Other articles explore how the novel has been transformed through different mediums and contexts over the centuries. The collection includes two essays by Rasilla.

The idea and content for the book grew out of an April 2015 UNH symposium that commemorated the 400th anniversary of the second part of Cervantes’ famous novel. A diverse group of experts, some of them internationally known for their work, gathered to discuss and share their research on “Don Quixote.”

“The positive, insightful, innovative and unique approaches to the subject brought by participants certainly proved the need and relevance of the conference, which re-opened the Cervantine text to new avenues of research and interpretation in the 21st century,” says Rasilla, who is pleased to be able to share these works widely now through “A Novel Without Boundaries.” Funding from the UNH Center for the Humanities and Class of ‘54 Enrichment Funds made the conference possible and facilitated the publication of the volume.

“A Novel Without Boundaries: Sensing Don Quixote 400 Years Later” is available at major online retailers.


UNH Hosts Pulitzer Prize Winning Journalist Bob Woodward Dec. 6

November 14, 2016

photo of Bob Woodward

Bob Woodward, renowned investigative journalist and author, will speak as part of the Rutman Distinguished Lecture Series on the American Presidency at the University of New Hampshire Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016, at 7 p.m. in the Granite State Room in the Memorial Union Building. His talk will focus on the age of the American presidency from Nixon to now. The event is free and open to the public but registration is required.

Woodward is an associate editor of The Washington Post, where he has worked since 1971. He has shared in two Pulitzer Prizes, first in 1973 for the coverage of the Watergate scandal with Carl Bernstein, and second in 2002 as the lead reporter for coverage of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

He has authored or coauthored 18 books, all of which have been national non-fiction bestsellers. Twelve of those have been #1 national bestsellers. His most recent book, “The Last of the President’s Men,” was published in October 2015.

Bob Schieffer of CBS News has said, “Woodward has established himself as the best reporter of our time. He may be the best reporter of all time.”

Gene Roberts, the former managing editor of The New York Times, has called the Woodward-Bernstein Watergate coverage, “maybe the single greatest reporting effort of all time.” In listing the all-time 100 best non-fiction books, Time Magazine has called “All the President’s Men” by Bernstein and Woodward “Perhaps the most influential piece of journalism in history.”

Housed in the College of Liberal Arts at UNH, the Rutman Distinguished Lecture Series on the American Presidency is generously supported by J. Morgan ’84 and Tara Rutman. The series focuses on American political history with an emphasis on the modern and historical context of the American presidency. The 2016 Rutman Lecture is part of Celebrate 150: The Campaign for UNH, celebrating 150 years of success at UNH and setting a bold course for the next 150 years.

Celebrate 150 logo


The Political Stage

November 3, 2016

Meg Heckman

Edited from a longer piece by Jody Record in UNH Today

Even if you haven’t seen the “Saturday Night Live” sketches featuring Alec Baldwin as Donald Trump and Kate McKinnon as Hillary Clinton, it’s likely you’ve read about them. But there is more to it than the laughs. For students in Meg Heckman’s journalism classes, these shows serve another purpose.

“They’re a way to help make sense of things that feel far away or are hard for students to wrap their heads around,” Heckman says.

As part of their homework assignments, she asks students to follow — and to be able to criticize — the news. More than once in this election, political satire has become the news, leading Heckman, who teaches reporting, editing, digital storytelling and media entrepreneurship, to use clips from several comedy shows as teaching tools.

“They are good discussion starters,” Heckman says. “We talk a lot about false balance in journalism — about the problems of seeking objectivity and fairness. These shows can be useful in helping students make sense of what they are hearing.”

What is important, she says, is to make sure voters know how to think critically. “I don’t think satire and humor can be the only mechanism we use, but it can be part of a broader conversation.”

“Our job is to have conversations around the news that students are consuming on a daily basis and, where it’s appropriate, help them to draw connections and ask the questions about what it means to be human now and what society is facing now,” Heckman says. “If we are mindful about what they are seeing and hearing, and ensure they can ask good questions, we can help them find the truth.”

Read the full story


A Real Game of Thrones

November 2, 2016

crow croaking J-Term;

What are you doing over winter break? Get ahead on coursework. January Term begins December 28 for online courses and runs through January 20.

New this year is Game of Thrones: Power and Politics in Renaissance Europe (HIST 498), a fully online course that satisfies the historical perspectives discovery category.

Or choose from dozens of other online offerings in the College of Liberal Arts, including:

Graphic Design (ARTS 596)
Resume Writing (ENGL 504)
Breaking Down Breaking Bad (JUST 595)
Just Business: The Ethics of Markets and Money (PHIL 440)

Check courses.unh.edu for the full list.

Registration is open now on Webcat.


On the Trail of Witches

October 27, 2016

photo of Jorge Abril Sanchez

excerpted/edited from a longer piece by Jennifer Saunders

Goblins, ghosts, werewolves, witches. At this time of year, those words conjure images of Halloween and favorite scary stories.

For one member of the UNH faculty, however, research into the folklore and fears of the past has attracted the attention of Smithsonian.com. Jorge Abril Sánchez, a lecturer in Spanish in the department of languages, literatures, and cultures, was contacted over the summer by a Smithsonian reporter to share his expertise for an article on the Basque country in Spain, the site of the largest witch trial in world history.

In Spain over a five-year period in the early 1600s, more than 7,000 people were accused of witchcraft, at least 2,000 were “examined” — with many of those investigations involving torture — and 11 lost their lives.

Abril Sánchez confirms there are some similarities between what happened in the Salem, Mass. witch trials and what happened in Spain. In both instances, children played a key role, with many manipulated to retaliate against familial enemies. And, in Spain and Salem, anyone who did not fit the mold of the ruling religion or government was at risk for persecution.

There were differences, however.  In Spain, he notes, there were defenders within the church who were skeptical about the accusations. Of the more than 7,000 accused, six were killed while five died in jail before all 11 were eventually pardoned — compared to Salem, where 20 people of the 200 accused were killed.

Read the full story in UNH Today.

 


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