Become a STEM Teacher in Rural N.H. Schools

December 19, 2016

students in classroom

Ever thought about becoming a teacher? UNH is recruiting individuals interested in teaching in rural N.H. schools with a background in math or science but who do not yet have a teaching credential for the new Teacher Residency for Rural Education Program (TRRE).

TRRE is a 15-month teacher residency program that prepares high quality teachers in either elementary or secondary education math or science. During their first summer, residents will take graduate coursework, observe in schools, and complete a community-based internship to learn about the resources of the communities in which they will teach. During the academic year, residents will complete a yearlong “residency” alongside an experienced master teacher in an elementary, middle, or high school classroom.

Residents receive a living wage to support their learning while earning a master’s degree and teacher certification. In addition, during the first two years as a new teacher, Residents receive ongoing support and professional development. Residents commit to teach in rural high need N.H. schools for three years following graduation.

The first cohort begins May 2017. An undergraduate degree in either a math or science discipline is recommended but not required. Those with related backgrounds may still be eligible. Students who plan to earn their bachelor’s degrees in May ’17 are eligible.

Interested individuals should contact Leslie Couse (Leslie.Couse@unh.edu) for further information.


Towering Sounds

December 16, 2016

photo of Peter Urquhart at carillon

When it comes to campus traditions, there are few more familiar than the songs that toll from the Thompson Hall tower every morning at 11. Listen for a moment and you might hear a familiar tune — the theme from “Harry Potter,” perhaps, or, during the holiday season, a Christmas carol. This week, though, you may want to listen a little more closely as you walk through campus. That’s because 10 new student and staff compositions will make a ringing debut on the carillon.

Peter Urquhart, associate professor of music, has been the UNH carilloneur since 2000. Earlier this year, Urquhart began seeking submissions for the university’s second carillon composition contest. It was a way to make the instrument part of UNH’s sesquicentennial celebrations, as well as a way to draw attention to it.

He received submissions from undergraduates, graduate students and even staff members. Urquhart’s Music Theory II class chose the top 10 submissions, and the winning compositions began chiming across campus on Dec. 9.

One of the winners is Nate Faro ’15 ’16G, whose composition is based partly on a piece he’s writing for the UNH Wind Symphony. The symphony references UNH songs like “The Alma Mater” and “The New Hampshire Hymn,” and Faro had written a part for orchestral bells that he eventually scrapped.

“I feel like I’ve made a bit of a mark on the university,” he says. “It’s a really nice feeling when you have your own composition played, especially when you hear it ringing across campus.”

edited from a story by Larry Clow

Read the full story in UNH Today.

Watch Video: Behind the Music


Passing: Professor Emeritus John Shotter

December 12, 2016

photo of John Shotter

Remembrance by John Lannamann, associate professor of communication:

We received the sad news that our former colleague and good friend John Shotter died at his home in Whittlesford, England. John came to the Communication Department in 1991 and served as chair of the department from 1999 until 2001. He retired from UNH in 2004.

John was a prolific scholar and an extremely humble person. Although hired as a full professor, we were obliged to wait out the mandatory two-year period before presenting his case for tenure. One of his letter writers, Jerome Bruner, was incredulous that we would put someone with John’s record through such a process. He was right, but John would be the last to remind us of that fact. At the time, John had well over 100 publications appearing in a broad range of journals spanning many disciplines. Without the benefit of an institutionally mandated C.V., we’ve now lost count of his publication record since leaving UNH, but we know from following his work that the pace has kept up. Just last month, he published his most recent book, “Speaking, Actually: Towards a New ‘Fluid’ Common-Sense Understanding of Relational Becomings.” That book completes a life-long project that began with “Images of Man in Psychological Research” in 1975. In each of his nine subsequent books, he continued to upset our standard assumptions about how to study humans.

We’ll miss John. He was a good friend and a generous colleague who was at home in the Communication Department but kept ties with his original discipline of psychology while reaching out to kindred spirits in philosophy, sociology, anthropology and education. The College of Liberal Arts was fortunate to have him with us.

Professor Shotter was professor emeritus of communication. He passed away on December 8, 2016.


Feed 150!

December 9, 2016

boxing up food

As part of Celebrate 150: The Campaign for UNH, the College of Liberal Arts collected food and grocery story gift card donations from College faculty, staff and students to feed 150 people in need this holiday season. The College is working with Waysmeet UNH, home to the Cornucopia Food Pantry, to make the gifts available to individuals and families.

boxes ready to go


UNH Political Scientist Publishes Two Books on United Nations

November 22, 2016

book cover
Alynna Lyon, associate professor of political science, has written a book that explores the United States’ relationship to the United Nations. In “US Politics and the United Nations: A Tale of Dysfunctional Dynamics” (Lynne Rienner Publishers), Lyon examines the waxing and waning of U.S. support for the U.N., tracing events, actions and decisions from the end of World War I to the present.

U.S. Politics and the United Nations is available from the publisher and major online retailers.

book cover

A second book, “The United Nations in the 21st Century” (5th edition, Westview Press), which Lyon co-authored with Karen A. Mingst and Margaret P. Karns, provides an introduction to the United Nations, exploring the historical, institutional and theoretical foundations of the U.N. This newest edition focuses on major trends since 2012, including changing power dynamics, increasing threats to peace and security, and the challenges of climate change.

“The United Nations in the 21st Century” is available from the publisher and major online retailers.


UNH Linguist Publishes 10th Book

November 21, 2016

book cover

Rochelle Lieber, professor of English and linguistics, has released her 10th volume, “English Nouns: The Ecology of Nominalization” published by Cambridge University Press. The book explores English nominalizations, defined as complex nouns that are derived from verbs, adjectives and other nouns (for example, the noun “legalization” derives from the verb “legalize”).

Lieber uses data from Corpus of Contemporary American English to show that the syntactic patterns in which English nominalizations can be found and the range of possible readings they can express are very different from what has been claimed in past theoretical treatments. She argues that the relationship between form and meaning in the nominalization processes of English is virtually never one-to-one, but rather forms a complex web that can be likened to a derivational ecosystem.

“English Nouns: The Ecology of Nominalization” is available from the publisher and major online retailers.


New Book on Don Quixote Celebrates 400th Anniversary

November 18, 2016

book cover

Carmen García de la Rasilla, associate professor of Spanish, and Jorge Abril Sánchez, lecturer in Spanish have teamed up to edit a new collection of essays on Miguel de Cervantes’ “Don Quixote,” celebrating the 400th anniversary of the publication of the novel’s second part.

“A Novel Without Boundaries: Sensing Don Quixote 400 Years Later,” published by Juan de la Cuesta, includes articles that examine “Don Quixote” in relation to major literary forms and genres such as novels of chivalry, the Alexandrian epic narrative and the genesis of detective fiction. Other articles explore how the novel has been transformed through different mediums and contexts over the centuries. The collection includes two essays by Rasilla.

The idea and content for the book grew out of an April 2015 UNH symposium that commemorated the 400th anniversary of the second part of Cervantes’ famous novel. A diverse group of experts, some of them internationally known for their work, gathered to discuss and share their research on “Don Quixote.”

“The positive, insightful, innovative and unique approaches to the subject brought by participants certainly proved the need and relevance of the conference, which re-opened the Cervantine text to new avenues of research and interpretation in the 21st century,” says Rasilla, who is pleased to be able to share these works widely now through “A Novel Without Boundaries.” Funding from the UNH Center for the Humanities and Class of ‘54 Enrichment Funds made the conference possible and facilitated the publication of the volume.

“A Novel Without Boundaries: Sensing Don Quixote 400 Years Later” is available at major online retailers.


%d bloggers like this: