Recent Books by Psychology Faculty

Faculty members in the Department of Psychology have published books this year that together exemplify the wide range of subject-matter that UNH psychologists cover in their research, from the history of psychology to brain and cognition to social psychology.

book coverToward the Next Generation of Bystander Prevention of Sexual and Relationship Violence: Action Coils to Engage Communities

by Victoria L. Banyard
Springer Briefs in Criminology
Springer

This brief integrates and synthesizes an array of research about who helps others and under what conditions and discusses the implications of this research for a bystander intervention focused prevention agenda to reduce sexual and relationship violence in schools and communities. It combines an examination of bystander helping behavior in the specific context of sexual and relationship violence with social psychological research on bystander behavior outside that context in order to inform prevention efforts. This brief is designed for researchers, practitioners, and students concerned about violence prevention and who are interesting in bystander intervention as a promising prevention strategy. Connections between research and practice are the foundation of this brief.

Available from the publisher and major online retailers.

book coverInferences During Reading

edited by Edward J. O’Brien, Anne E. Cook, and Robert F. Lorch Jr.
Cambridge University Press

Inferencing is defined as ‘the act of deriving logical conclusions from premises known or assumed to be true’, and it is one of the most important processes necessary for successful comprehension during reading. This volume features contributions by distinguished researchers in cognitive psychology, educational psychology, and neuroscience on topics central to our understanding of the inferential process during reading. The chapters cover aspects of inferencing that range from the fundamental bottom up processes that form the basis for an inference to occur, to the more strategic processes that transpire when a reader is engaged in literary understanding of a text. Basic activation mechanisms, word-level inferencing, methodological considerations, inference validation, causal inferencing, emotion, development of inferences processes as a skill, embodiment, contributions from neuroscience, and applications to naturalistic text are all covered as well as expository text, online learning materials, and literary immersion.

Available from the publisher and major online retailers.

book coverHermann Lotze: An Intellectual Biography

by William R. Woodward
Cambridge University Press

As a philosopher, psychologist, and physician, the German thinker Hermann Lotze (1817–81) defies classification. Working in the mid-nineteenth-century era of programmatic realism, he critically reviewed and rearranged theories and concepts in books on pathology, physiology, medical psychology, anthropology, history, aesthetics, metaphysics, logic, and religion. Leading anatomists and physiologists reworked his hypotheses about the central and autonomic nervous systems. Dozens of fin-de-siècle philosophical contemporaries emulated him, yet often without acknowledgment, precisely because he had made conjecture and refutation into a method. In spite of Lotze’s status as a pivotal figure in nineteenth-century intellectual thought, no complete treatment of his work exists, and certainly no effort to take account of the feminist secondary literature. Hermann Lotze: An Intellectual Biography is the first full-length historical study of Lotze’s intellectual origins, scientific community, institutional context, and worldwide reception.

Available from the publisher and major online retailers.

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