On the Trail of Witches

October 27, 2016

photo of Jorge Abril Sanchez

excerpted/edited from a longer piece by Jennifer Saunders

Goblins, ghosts, werewolves, witches. At this time of year, those words conjure images of Halloween and favorite scary stories.

For one member of the UNH faculty, however, research into the folklore and fears of the past has attracted the attention of Smithsonian.com. Jorge Abril Sánchez, a lecturer in Spanish in the department of languages, literatures, and cultures, was contacted over the summer by a Smithsonian reporter to share his expertise for an article on the Basque country in Spain, the site of the largest witch trial in world history.

In Spain over a five-year period in the early 1600s, more than 7,000 people were accused of witchcraft, at least 2,000 were “examined” — with many of those investigations involving torture — and 11 lost their lives.

Abril Sánchez confirms there are some similarities between what happened in the Salem, Mass. witch trials and what happened in Spain. In both instances, children played a key role, with many manipulated to retaliate against familial enemies. And, in Spain and Salem, anyone who did not fit the mold of the ruling religion or government was at risk for persecution.

There were differences, however.  In Spain, he notes, there were defenders within the church who were skeptical about the accusations. Of the more than 7,000 accused, six were killed while five died in jail before all 11 were eventually pardoned — compared to Salem, where 20 people of the 200 accused were killed.

Read the full story in UNH Today.

 


Passing: Earl C. Hagstrom

October 25, 2016

hagstromearl300

Professor Earl C. Hagstrom died peacefully on October 16, 2016 at the age of 88. Earl was a faculty member in the Department of Psychology from 1965 until 1994. He graduated from Tufts University in 1952 and received his Ph.D. from Brown University in 1957. His graduate work with Carl Pfaffmann included some of the first systematic studies of the activity of taste fibers in the chorda tympani nerve. Earl held faculty positions at Princeton and Columbia Universities and conducted post-doctoral research at the Medical College of Virginia. He joined the faculty at the University of New Hampshire in 1965 just as the doctoral program in psychology was starting up. Earl was one of the earliest faculty members at UNH in the neurosciences. He continued to study gustatory physiology in several species and later branched out to examine EEG activity to understand the neural basis of cognitive function in human subjects. He was a popular and well-respected teacher, renown for his ability to hold pieces of chalk in both hands and simultaneously sketch anatomical structures in the left and right hemispheres of the brain. Earl served as Chair of the Psychology Department in the mid 1980s. As Chair he successfully negotiated challenging transitions as the department moved out of antiquated facilities in Conant Hall into temporary quarters in wood frame houses and then back into the newly renovated Conant Hall. Earl will be remembered for his many contributions to the Psychology Department as it grew to serve the largest undergraduate major at UNH and a graduate program with a long history of success preparing future faculty for colleges and universities across the country.

SERVICES: He will be laid to rest in a private family service. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to The Leukemia And Lymphoma Society, 9 Erie Dr., Natick, Mass., 01760.

Read obituary published in seacoastonline.

This post was written by Robert Mair, UNH Professor of Psychology


New Climate Change Exhibit in Portsmouth Features UNH Faculty, Students

October 18, 2016
Globe #6 by Alexandra Caggiano

Globe #6 by Alexandra Caggiano

The UNH Department of Art and Art History will participate in a collaborative exhibition devoted to the theme of climate change that will run from October 21 to November 12, 2016 at 3S Artspace in Portsmouth, N.H. Since last year, the department has been working with NextGen Climate NH and 3S Artspace to develop an exhibition of art works by current students, alumni, technical staff and faculty. All art works in “Rise: Climate Change in Our World” will address the topic of climate change. According to Prof. Craig Hood, chair of the Department of Art and Art History, the exhibition is an “unprecedented undertaking by the art department in collaboration with NextGen Climate NH, an environmental advocacy organization which proposed the idea for the exhibition, and 3S Artspace, a major art institution in southeastern New Hampshire. We think the topic is important, of course, and hope this sort of collaboration with groups and institutions outside the university community will become a more regular occurrence for our program in the future.”

An opening reception will be held Friday, October 21, 2016 from 5-8 p.m.

Directions to 3S Artspace.

Exhibitions are free and open to the public.

Gallery hours: Tuesday-Friday: 10am-6pm Saturday: 12-5PM Sunday+Monday: CLOSED


This Was A Really Bad Idea

October 11, 2016

graphic of David Kaye's face in center of a black hole

David Kaye, UNH professor of theatre, will deliver the College of Liberal Arts Lindberg Lecture entitled “This Was A Really Bad Idea: Life Vs. Theatre and the Creative Abyss.” The lecture will take place on Friday, October 21, from 2:30-3:30 p.m., with a reception from 2:00-2:30 p.m. Both events will be held in Murkland 110.

David Kaye was selected as the 2016 recipient of the Lindberg Award, given annually to the outstanding teacher-scholar in the College of Liberal Arts. Professor Kaye’s scholarly and creative work focuses on acting, directing, playwriting and applied theatre. He deftly produces, directs and performs a wide range of material, from the ancient Greeks to contemporary works, at UNH and for equity and non-equity companies regionally. Professor Kaye’s excellence in the classroom has been recognized with a UNH Excellence in Teaching Award and the Leonidas A. Nickole Theatre Educator of the Year Award from the New England Theatre Conference. He also won the University Social Justice Award in 2010 and the Outstanding Associate Professor Award in 2012.


“Old Ben’s Farm” Premiere

October 5, 2016

The UNH Wind Symphony in the College of Liberal Arts debuted an original composition by Andrew Boysen, UNH professor of music, commissioned for UNH’s Sesquicentennial Celebration. “Old Ben’s Farm” premiered on Friday, September 30, 2016 in the Whittemore Center.

Watch video:

Read about the composition process for this piece.


UNH Awarded Federal Grant to Get STEM Teachers in Rural N.H. Schools

October 4, 2016

Thanks to a five-year $4.3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education, the University of New Hampshire will prepare and support 60 highly qualified elementary and secondary math and science teachers for rural, high-need New Hampshire schools beginning this summer.

“We are excited to bring our excellence in teacher preparation to the North Country,” said Leslie Couse, professor of education and department chair in the College of Liberal Arts. “Grant opportunities that focus on rural communities are rare. This grant will provide the means for deep clinical training during a year-long residency, a hallmark of high-quality teacher preparation and allow students to graduate with less debt, while becoming connected to the community.”

The University of New Hampshire Teacher Residency for Rural Education (UNH-TRRE) is a 15-month graduate level program designed to prepare elementary and secondary STEM teachers to teach in rural New Hampshire communities. It will support “residents” in learning, teaching, and living in rural NH communities. During their first summer, residents will take graduate coursework, observe in schools, and complete a community-based internship to learn about the resources of the communities in which they will teach. During the academic year, residents will complete a yearlong “residency” alongside an experienced master teacher in an elementary, middle, or high school classroom.

Residents will receive a living wage stipend and substantial scholarship during the program and will commit to teaching in a rural New Hampshire school for at least three years after graduation. Upon completion of the program, UNH-TRRE will continue to support its graduates during their first two years of teaching.

More.

 


Alumna Recognized for High-Impact Leadership

October 3, 2016

photo of Katie Bouton

Katie Bouton ’96 (English journalism and women’s studies) has won a 2016 Boston Brava Award from SmartCEO. Bouton is founder and CEO of Koya Leadership Partners, an executive search firm for nonprofit organizations.

The Brava Awards celebrate high-impact female business leaders in three categories: CEOs, Executive Directors of Nonprofits and C-suite executives. An independent committee of local business leaders selects winners based on company growth, community impact and mentoring.

SmartCEO reaches over 100,000 people monthly through SmartCEO magazine and SmartCEO.com, serving CEOs in the Baltimore, Boston, Charlotte, New York, Philadelphia and Washington, DC, metropolitan areas.

Guided by the philosophy that “The right person in the right place can change the world,” Bouton founded Koya Leadership Partners in 1994 to help nonprofit organizations find inspiring leaders of change who will advance their mission for greater impact in the communities they serve and the world.


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