Public Humanities

November 9, 2017

photo of six panelists at table

Six College of Liberal Arts faculty members presented on UNH’s innovative public humanities fellows program at the National Humanities Conference, held Nov. 2-5, 2017, in Boston, Mass.

The UNH Center for the Humanities annually awards up to three fellowships of $5000 each for publicly engaged humanities projects. The awards enable individual humanities scholars or teams to undertake collaborative projects, partnering with community or other public organizations, bringing humanities scholarship to bear in the context of advancing democracy, civic life and the public good.

Learn about the projects funded by the public humanities fellows program.

The faculty presenting at the Conference, pictured above, left to right, were Eleanor Harrison-Buck (anthropology), Christina Ortmeier-Hooper (English), Alecia Magnifico (English), Burt Feintuch (English and the Center for the Humanities), Nick Smith (philosophy) and Svetlana Peshkova (anthropology).

The conference, co-hosted with the Federation of State Humanities Councils, was the second in a series of three joint national meetings that bring the humanities community together as whole to consider how, by leveraging strengths, they can achieve broader public impact and showcase the fundamental role the humanities play in addressing both local and global challenges.

Nick Smith presenting

Professor Nick Smith

Svetlana Peshkova presenting

Professor Svetlana Peshkova


Lecture to Address Crimes Against Humanity at IG Farben Auschwitz, Nov. 14

November 6, 2017

drawing of production site at Auchwitz

Martin Rumscheidt will speak about his experience as the son of a man complicit in Nazi crimes as part of the Heilbronner Lecture series on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017 at 5 p.m. in 115 Murkland Hall. The lecture, titled “White Collar Crimes Against Humanity: IG Farben Auschwitz, My Father’s Company,” is free and open to the public.

Rumscheidt is an ordained minister in the United Church of Canada and retired professor of historical theology at the University of Windsor, Halifax, Nova Scotia, and Charles University, Prague. He is the translator of “Act and Being” (1996) in Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works, English edition, and cotranslator with the late Barbara Rumscheidt of Soelle’s “Against the Wind” (1999) and “The Silent Cry” (2001).

Rumscheidt’s father was an employee of IG Farben, the chemical company and second largest producer in Hitler’s military-industrial complex. The senior Rumscheidt’s colleague and close friend Walter Dürrfeld was in charge of constructing and administering IG Farber Auschwitz-Monowitz, a production site that drew the majority of its workforce from the Birkenau concentration camp. Dürrfeld was sentenced to 8 years in prison by the Nuremberg court for his crimes, though he was released early. Rumscheidt’s father never addressed the implications of his work for IG Farben and its participation in the “extermination through labor” program the company implemented at Monowitz.

The Hans Heilbronner lecture series honors the memory of Hans Heilbronner, professor of history, who served the University of New Hampshire with distinction from 1954 until 1991. This event is sponsored by the Endowed Fund for Holocaust Education.

More information can be found at: https://cola.unh.edu/heilbronner2017


Caves of Dunhuang

November 2, 2017

men praying

The University of New Hampshire will host an exhibition of the caves at Mogao, a top United Nations World Heritage Site located in Dunhuang, China, Nov. 13-17, 2017, in Huddleston Hall. The site is famous for its caves featuring statues and wall paintings spanning 1,000 years of Buddhist art.

The exhibit is free and open to the public Nov. 13 from 4:40-8 p.m.; Nov. 14-16 from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Nov. 17 from 10 a.m.-noon.

Dunhuang was at the crossroads of trade, cultures, ethnicities and religions along the ancient Silk Road from 300 BCE to about 1400 CE. Approximately 700 caves were hollowed out along a mile-long stretch that housed thousands of square feet of ancient murals and colored Buddhist statues, as well as tens of thousands of ancient scrolls, paintings, religious texts/sutra and government documents. The caves offer a rare glimpse into the lives of the diverse people who traveled along the ancient Silk Road.

The exhibition at UNH includes photos, multimedia, and original-scale replicas of dozens of murals and the entirety of Cave 285, a painstakingly recreated work of art in its own right. The cave contains images of Chinese and Indian deities and a visualization of a tale of Buddhist redemption known as the “500 Robbers.” The replicas are the work of artists and scholars from the Dunhuang Research Academy, the institution responsible for the conservation, management and research of the World Heritage Site.

Two lectures will accompany the exhibition:

“The Art of Dunhuang” by Huaqing Luo, deputy director of Dunhuang Research Academy, will take place Nov. 13, 2017, from 2-3 p.m. in the Memorial Union Building Theatre II.

“The Murals of Dunhuang” by Yige Wang, co-director of the Confucius Institute at UNH; Brian Chu, UNH professor of art; and Julee Holcombe, UNH associate professor of art; will take place Nov. 16, 2017, from 12:30-1:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union Building’s Granite State Room.

The exhibition is sponsored by the Confucius Institute at UNH and made possible by Hanban (Confucius Institute Headquarters), Dunhuang Research Academy, the UNH College of Liberal Arts, Bryant University and Chengdu University.

Photo: Worshipping Bodhisattva, mural, Cave 285, Wei Dynasty (535-556 A.D.)


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