Welcome to Homecoming and Family Weekend

September 22, 2017

football game

Join the College of Liberal Arts for these College-sponsored activities during Homecoming and Family Weekend this weekend.

Friday, September 22

College of Liberal Arts Museum of Art Exhibition
10am to 4pm
Museum of Art, Paul Creative Arts Center
Made Masculine
The thirteen contemporary artists in this exhibition accept the framework that masculinity is made, fashioned, and modified generation to generation. Selected works of art explore the artifice of masculinity through themes such as strength, desire, and intimacy while posing the question: What does it mean to be made masculine or to make one’s own masculinity? Guest curator, Lisa Crossman, Ph.D., Curator, Fitchburg Art Museum.

Willie Cole: On Site
Highlights from the body of work by contemporary African-American artist Willie Cole and features 13 artworks, a video, and includes an installation of a massive chandelier made of recycled water bottles. The traveling exhibition is organized by the David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora, University of Maryland, and is co-curated by the David C. Driskell Center’s Deputy Director, Dorit Yaron, and Executive Director, Professor Curlee R. Holton.

ham smithCollege of Liberal Arts Hamilton Smith Grand Opening
3:30pm to 5pm
Hamilton Smith
Ribbon Cutting, Self-Guided Tours, Music and Refreshments.


Saturday, September 23

Homecoming Family Tent
12pm to 3pm
The Great Lawn
Fun for the whole family! Stop by for a few minutes or all afternoon to enjoy music, family friendly activities, and food. Reconnect with friends and meet other members of the UNH community. The College is featuring a student jazz combo, hands-on art activities and a free t-shirt raffle. Plus loads of candy!

moto jacketCollege of Liberal Arts Museum of Art Exhibition
1pm to 5pm
Museum of Art, Paul Creative Arts Center
Made Masculine
The thirteen contemporary artists in this exhibition accept the framework that masculinity is made, fashioned, and modified generation to generation. Selected works of art explore the artifice of masculinity through themes such as strength, desire, and intimacy while posing the question: What does it mean to be made masculine or to make one’s own masculinity? Guest curator, Lisa Crossman, Ph.D., Curator, Fitchburg Art Museum.

Willie Cole: On Site
Highlights from the body of work by contemporary African-American artist Willie Cole and features 13 artworks, a video, and includes an installation of a massive chandelier made of recycled water bottles. The traveling exhibition is organized by the David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora, University of Maryland, and is co-curated by the David C. Driskell Center’s Deputy Director, Dorit Yaron, and Executive Director, Professor Curlee R. Holton.


Sunday, September 24

College of Liberal Arts Museum of Art Exhibition
1pm to 5pm
Museum of Art, Paul Creative Arts Center
Made Masculine
The thirteen contemporary artists in this exhibition accept the framework that masculinity is made, fashioned, and modified generation to generation. Selected works of art explore the artifice of masculinity through themes such as strength, desire, and intimacy while posing the question: What does it mean to be made masculine or to make one’s own masculinity? Guest curator, Lisa Crossman, Ph.D., Curator, Fitchburg Art Museum.

Willie Cole: On Site
Highlights from the body of work by contemporary African-American artist Willie Cole and features 13 artworks, a video, and includes an installation of a massive chandelier made of recycled water bottles. The traveling exhibition is organized by the David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora, University of Maryland, and is co-curated by the David C. Driskell Center’s Deputy Director, Dorit Yaron, and Executive Director, Professor Curlee R. Holton.

College of Liberal Arts Amy Beach Highlight Concert: Peggy Vagts, flute and Hsiang Tu, Piano
Featuring Sonata in A Minor and Theme and Variations for Flute and String Quartet

3pm
Bratton Recital Hall, Paul Creative Arts Center
Free
The UNH music department, UNH Library, and organizations around New Hampshire are celebrating the 150th birthday of New Hampshire pianist and composer Amy Beach this year. Born in Henniker in 1867, Beach became an internationally renowned performer and was the first American woman to write a symphony. Hear what makes Beach a state treasure.

FULL Calendar of UNH Events


A Fine Restoration Caught on Video

August 22, 2017

photo of mural

They’ve been hidden from view for decades, but now two murals on the walls of Hamilton Smith Hall will see the light of day again. Conservationists have been restoring the WPA-era murals, which were completed in July 1940 when Ham Smith was the university’s library. Art history graduate Corrine Long ’12 has been part of the restoration, which was funded in large part by Peter T. Paul ’67, whose godfather, George Lloyd, was one of the artists.

The College of Liberal Arts is seeking memories for a time capsule that will be entombed within the newly renovated Ham Smith during a grand re-opening celebration in September. Share your memories by Sept. 8, and then join us for the Sept. 22 grand re-opening during Homecoming and Family Weekend.

video by Scott Ripley, post written by Tracey Bentley
Source: UNH Today


Keeping It ‘Frozen,’ but Still Fresh

August 15, 2017

UNH alumna Jennifer Lee ’92 (English) is adapting her Oscar-winning movie “Frozen” for the Big Apple. The show will open in the spring of 2018.

Read the New York Times article: Disney’s Challenge: Keeping It ‘Frozen,’ but Still Fresh


Scholarships Awarded for Study Abroad in Italy

May 4, 2017
Allison Hoey

Allison Hoey

Two students have received $4,000 scholarships from the COLA Fund for Study in Italy that will enable them to study abroad in programs of their choice in Italy.

Allison Hoey of Pelham, N.H., has always had a passion and interest in painting, but once she discovered art history, she realized that knowledge of history and context can have a big influence on an artist’s work. Currently a studio art major, she’s decided to pursue both a B.F.A. in painting and an art history major. Next she wants to experience art and its history first-hand in Italy. Hoey plans to study abroad in the spring 2018 semester and is currently considering her options, trying to decide among two institutions in Florence and one in Verona.

“Being surrounded by the work of influential artists will inspire my own work throughout the rest of my undergraduate career and beyond,” says Hoey.

History major Kelly Sheehan of Brockton, Mass., has loved history for as long as she can remember. It was in a history class in high school that she learned about the Renaissance, from whence sprang her second love: Italy and all things Italian. Now in her sixth semester of Italian at UNH, she couldn’t be happier:  except maybe if she were actually in Italy. Thanks to this scholarship, Sheehan will achieve that goal. She will attend the UNH-managed program on nutrition and culture in Ascoli Piceno, Italy, in summer 2017.

“To be able to stand and look at the things I have spent so long studying and learning about is surreal to me,” says Sheehan. “…I will be able to see firsthand some of the amazing monuments, statues and museums I have always dreamt of.”

The COLA Fund for Study in Italy supports UNH COLA students with a demonstrated interest in art, art history and Italian language who plan to study abroad in Italy. Awards are made to one or more students each spring. The Fund is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad and made possible through the generosity of a donor.


International Sculpture Day

April 24, 2017
photo of sculpture

Level Growth
glazed stoneware
Griffin Sinclair-Wingate

Students in Don Williams’ ceramics workshop contributed sculptures to the International Sculpture Day Exhibition at Bedrock Gardens in Lee, N.H. The pieces are on display alongside works by ten New Hampshire sculptors and set amid Bedrock Garden’s landscaped gardens, fields and woods. The exhibit opened on April 23 and runs through May 7, 2017. More information can be found at bedrockgardens.org.

“Making art for a class assignment is a very different experience than making art for a public exhibition,” says Williams. “Students taking part in this exhibition realized first-hand what these differences are while gaining real life experience. They became more invested in the project knowing their pieces would be judged by other participating professional artists and the public. Deadlines had to be met. Pieces required titles, prices, and artist statements.”

Williams and the students spent two days installing the sculptures in a steady forty-degree drizzle. But the sun shone for the opening, which over two hundred people attended.

International Sculpture Day is an event held worldwide to promote the creation and understanding of sculpture and its contribution to society. Hundreds of artists, organizations and institutions in over 20 countries celebrated the day this year.


Talking Art at the Capitol

April 14, 2017
Nancy Pelosi addressing advocates

Raina Ames snaps a cell phone shot during Nancy Pelosi’s address at Arts Advocacy Day in Washington, D.C.

Thirty-six delegates from the Educational Theatre Association (EdTA), representing sixteen states, attended Arts Advocacy Day in Washington, D.C., last month, among them Raina Ames, associate professor of theatre at UNH. Ames is a member of the Association’s New Hampshire board and one of only five members nationally to receive the EdTA’s Hawkins Award this year. The $1,000 award is intended to encourage member advocacy efforts by defraying the cost of attending the annual event.

The 2017 Arts Advocacy Day, sponsored by Americans for the Arts, had record attendance, convening more than 700 people from cultural, civic and grassroots organizations across the country to push for strong public policies and financial support for the arts. The advocates were welcomed on Capitol Hill by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, among others, and met with State legislators to discuss the importance of the arts.

“People from both sides of the political divide have a stake in saving the arts, and that was so uplifting,” says Ames, who directs the theatre education program at UNH.

For Ames, one of the highlights of the experience was civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis’ address to the advocates.

“It was inspiring to see that after all he has been through, his integrity and sense of social justice still emanate from his entire being. If John Lewis could survive all that he has in his life and remain a stalwart defender of what is right, I can go visit my four state legislators and talk about the arts!”

The Educational Theatre Association is a national nonprofit organization with approximately 100,000 student and professional members dedicated to shaping lives through theatre education.


Rivard Awarded PEN/New England for Poetry

April 12, 2017

photo of David Rivard

David Rivard has been named winner of the 2017 PEN/New England Award for poetry for his 2016 book, “Standoff.” Rivard is a professor of English at UNH.

American poet Jericho Brown selected “Standoff” for the honor, which recognizes a book by a New England writer judged as best in its genre.

“I feel so deeply honored by this recognition from PEN/New England, touched really, especially when I think of the astonishing community and tradition it represents,” says Rivard. “Last year was, as always, a banner year for books by poets from this region, among them some by my dearest friends in this life — I can’t imagine having written the poems in ‘Standoff’ without their examples and affection in mind.”

Also recognized this year are Matthew Desmond in the nonfiction category for “Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City” and Robin MacArthur in the fiction category for “Half Wild.”

The awards ceremony was held at the Kennedy Library in Boston, Mass., on April 2, 2017.

Rivard recalls: “As Jennifer Haigh said at the 2016 awards ceremony, ‘For as long as there’s been an America, New England has been home to writers. We are the land of John Updike and John Cheever, Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton, Frederick Douglass and Henry David Thoreau. To say a book is the best by a New England writer is saying a great deal indeed.’ It’s sort of amazing when you think about it that way.”

Past winners of PEN/New England awards include E.B. White, Louise Gluck, Sebastian Junger, Mary Oliver, Tracy Kidder, Donald Hall and Reginald Dwayne Betts.

PEN/New England awards, established in 1975, celebrate New England’s long and illustrious literary tradition by recognizing outstanding fiction, poetry and nonfiction by New England authors.

Rivard is the author of five other books of poetry: “Otherwise Elsewhere,” “Sugartown,” “Bewitched Playground,” “Wise Poison,” winner of the James Laughlin Prize from the Academy of American Poets and a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award, and “Torque,” winner of the Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize. He teaches poetry writing to undergraduates and to graduates in the M.F.A. in Writing program at UNH.

photos of Rivard at awards ceremony

TOP: David Rivard receives PEN/New England Award for poetry from poet Jericho Brown. MIDDLE: Awards luncheon program. BOTTOM: Rivard pictured with daughter, Simone Rivard ’16, and wife, Michaela Sullivan, at the awards luncheon at the Kennedy Library on April 2, 2017.


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