UNH Classics Professor Awarded Research Fellowship in Germany

February 3, 2017

Harriet Fertik

Harriet Fertik, assistant professor of classics, has been awarded a research fellowship for postdoctoral researchers from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. She will spend the academic year 2017-2018 at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

The Alexander von Humboldt Foundation enables highly-qualified scientists and scholars from abroad who are just embarking on their academic careers and who completed their doctorates less than four years ago to spend extended periods of research in Germany.

During her fellowship, Fertik will work on a new book project, “Outside the Ideal Community: Spaces for Education and Politics in Greco-Roman Antiquity and the Works of W. E. B. Du Bois.” She will investigate education in political communities that do not value the equal participation of its citizens in public discourse and action.

“While much work at the intersection of political and educational philosophy in classical studies focuses on the formation of the ideal community and how to educate its members,” says Fertik, “I investigate how, where and why education takes place when these ideals cannot be realized. I will use W. E. B. Du Bois’ discussions of classical training for African Americans to frame my study of education and politics in the ancient world.”

While recent scholarship has paid greater attention to the influence of Du Bois’ classical training in his thinking about politics, education and race, says Fertik, no one has yet examined the potential of Du Bois’ work to shed light on key issues in classical antiquity.

Humboldt-Universität has an active program in African-American studies, and Du Bois himself was a doctoral student there in the late 19th century.

“The Humboldt fellowship will give me the time necessary to make significant progress in researching and writing this book,” says Fertik.

Fertik has also received a faculty fellowship from the UNH Center for the Humanities to support this project.


Five Students Named 2016 Trout Scholars

April 27, 2016
B. Thomas Trout

B. Thomas Trout

Five New Hampshire students have been awarded B. Thomas Trout Scholarships from the College of Liberal Arts to support their study abroad experiences in the 2016-17 academic year.

The scholarship recipients are Jessica Gero, an English teaching and classics double major from Milton; Jess Hesse, a German major from Derry; Andrew Jablonski, a French major from Newmarket; RoseAlaina Leone, a psychology and anthropology double major from Walpole; and Carlos Martens, an English Journalism major from Newmarket.

The B. Thomas Trout Scholars Fund supports academically outstanding College of Liberal Arts undergraduates, allowing them to participate in UNH-managed study abroad programs in the College.

Learn more about the recipients.


2016 Liberal Arts Student Fellows Named

March 15, 2016

Murkland Hall column

Each year, the College selects a handful of students to represent the University, the College, and their respective academic departments. Students are nominated by department chairs and chosen by the associate dean of the College. Typically seniors, Student Fellows have dynamic backgrounds and stellar academic records. They serve as student ambassadors during the open houses for prospective students, describing their experiences to and answering questions from students and parents. Other responsibilities include meeting with alumni and donors to the College, and representing the College at special events. The Student Fellows program is intended to recognize fine achievement at UNH and provide a way for students to serve the University in their final year of study.

The College of Liberal Arts is pleased to announce the 2016 Student Fellows: Hannah Drake, an English and International Affairs major from Nashua, N.H.; Ian MacKay, a German and International Affairs major from Peterborough, N.H.; Michael Mignanelli, a classics major from Campton, N.H.; Lauren Percy, a history major from Bow, N.H.; and Stephanie Yee, a psychology major from Concord, N.H.

Click here to read the bios of the student fellows.


Humanities Faculty Fellows Announced

October 28, 2015

Center logo

The Center for the Humanities announces the award of its 2016-2017 Faculty Research Fellowships to four faculty members in support of their research:

Harriet Fertik (Classics, Humanities, and Italian Studies)
“Outside the Ideal Community: Spaces for Education and Politics in Greco-Roman Antiquity and W.E.B. Dubois” will use questions raised in The Souls of Black Folk to investigate the relationship between education and citizenship in antiquity.

Nicole Fox (Sociology)
“Rebuilding from the Ashes of a Traumatic Past: The Everyday Complexities of Memory and Reconciliation in the Lives of Rwandan Genocide Survivors” will chronicle how narratives of the Rwandan genocide are told and re-told almost two decades after the violence.

Eliga Gould (History)
“Crucible of Peace: 1783 and the Founding of the American Republic” will look at the tensions between the terms imposed by the treaty-makers and the wishes of the people whom the treaty purported to bind in one of the least-studied of the United States’ founding documents: The Treaty of Paris.

Subrena Smith (Philosophy)
“Developmental Systems Theory and Beyond” will be an interdisciplinary research project – drawing on philosophy, biology and psychology – that will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of Developmental Systems Theory with a view toward expanding on its strengths and rectifying its weaknesses.

Funded by the Center for the Humanities‘ general endowment and the Ben and Zelma Dorson Endowment in the Humanities, the fellowships provide a semester-long opportunity for junior and tenured faculty to pursue humanities research with no teaching obligations. Awardees participate in the Faculty Fellows Lecture Series in the year following their fellowship.


Recent Grad Awarded Prestigious Carnegie Fellowship

August 19, 2015

photo of Cory McKenzie

Cory McKenzie ’15 has been named a fellow in the Junior Fellows Program of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Each year the endowment offers only 10-12 one-year fellowships to recent graduates. Approximately 5 percent of applicants are selected from a pool of nominees from close to 400 participating colleges. Carnegie junior fellows work as research assistants to the endowment’s senior associates. They have the opportunity to conduct research for books, co-author journal articles and policy papers, participate in meetings with high-level officials, contribute to congressional testimony, and organize briefings attended by scholars, journalists, and government officials. McKenzie will work on the Japan Studies project in the Asian Program.

From Hampstead, N.H., McKenzie graduated in May with majors in history, philosophy, and classics. In his final semester, while studying abroad in Japan, he won the University’s Hood Achievement Prize, which recognizes the senior man who shows the greatest promise through character, scholarship, leadership, and usefulness to humanity. A member of the University Honors Program, McKenzie garnered a number of other awards as well as grants and scholarships during his time at UNH. He also was awarded a critical language scholarship from the U.S. Department of State that funded intensive language study in Japan.

Students interested in this opportunity may contact the UNH Office of National Fellowships.


2015 University-Wide Student Awards Announced

May 14, 2015

Each spring, university-wide, competitive achievement awards are given to only a dozen or so of the most accomplished and impressive undergraduates at UNH. This year, five liberal arts students won awards.

An award ceremony to honor these students was held on May 5.

Stephanie Kuhn and Larry Brickner-Wood

The Class of 1899 Prize was awarded to Stephanie A. Kuhn, a women’s studies and communication major from Kittery, Maine. The award recognizes a senior who has developed the highest ideals of good citizenship during his or her course of study. Stephanie is pictured here with one of her nominators, Rev. Larry Brickner-Wood.

Philip Horner-Richardson and Subrena Smith

The Frederick Smith Book Award went to Philip A. Horner-Richardson, a philosophy major from Cornish, N.H. This award recognizes the most meritorious student and supports the purchase of books. Philip is pictured here with one of his nominators, philosophy professor Subrena Smith.

Bryan Merrill and Lisa MacFarlane

The Jere A. Chase Service Award was awarded to Bryan W. Merrill, a political science and international affairs dual major from Londonderry, N.H. This award honors the graduating senior who has displayed outstanding service to the University. Bryan is pictured here with Provost Lisa MacFarlane.

Hannah Waller and Georgeann Murphy

The UNH Award of Excellence was awarded to Hannah M. Waller, a political science and international affairs dual major from Spokane, Wash. This award recognizes excellence in leadership, scholarship, and citizenship. Hannah is pictured here with one of her nominators, Georgeann Murphy, international research coordinator at UNH’s Hamel Center.

The Hood Achievement Prize was awarded to Cory McKenzie, a history, philosophy, and classics triple major from Hampstead, N.H. This award recognizes the senior man who shows the greatest promise through character, scholarship, leadership, and usefulness to humanity. Cory was studying abroad in Japan at the time of the award ceremony.

Congratulations to all!


Phi Beta Kappa Essay Contests, Submissions Due April 10

March 11, 2015

PBK key

Phi Beta Kappa is pleased to announce its Twenty-Seventh Annual Essay Competition for first-year students and sophomores, as well as the Eighteenth Annual Competition for juniors and seniors sponsored by the Humanities Program. The Phi Beta Kappa competition was initiated by Professor Barbara Cooper to encourage freshmen and sophomores in general education (now Discovery) courses to strive for excellence in written work. Students do not have to be Phi Beta Kappa members to submit essays; all are encouraged to submit their superior work.

Each competition will award a first prize of $100 and up to two additional prizes of $50 at the Phi Beta Kappa initiation ceremony on May 9, 2015 for superior essays of no more than 3000 words, written as regular assignments in Discovery (including Inquiry) courses offered in Fall 2014 or Spring 2015.

Essays submitted in courses offered during spring semester 2014 are also eligible, but only if their due date was subsequent to April 15th, 2014. The deadline for submission of essays is Thursday, April 10, 2015. Essays must be endorsed in a statement by the instructor of the course.

Essays will be judged on depth of analysis, clarity of thesis, originality of thinking, synthesis of evidence, clarity of expression, correct usage, and organization. Submissions should be scholarly essays rather than personal narratives. For further details, contact Professor Scott Smith (Classics) at 862-2388 or scott.smith@unh.edu.

Please mail all submissions, in hard copy with course number/title and instructor’s endorsement, to Professor Scott Smith, Murkland Hall Room 301.


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