COLA Faculty Awarded Professorships

March 30, 2017

photo of Murkland courtyard

Five faculty members in the College of Liberal Arts have received professorship awards, effective July 2017.

University professorships are supported through the generosity of donors and awarded to faculty members who have demonstrated the highest levels of excellence in teaching, scholarship (including the creative arts) and service over an extended period of time. The UNH provost awards professorships based on nominations from deans. Each professorship carries a 3-year term.

photo of Michele Dillon

Michele Dillon of the department of sociology will be the Class of 1944 Professor. The award recognizes an outstanding faculty member.

photo of Kurk Dorsey

Kurk Dorsey of the department of history will be the Class of 1938 Professor. Established by alumni from that class, this award recognizes excellence in teaching.

photo of Nora Draper

Nora Draper of the communication department will be the Roland H. O’Neal Professor. Established by Virginia O’Neal in memory of her husband, who was a member of the UNH Class of 1934, this award recognizes an outstanding untenured member of the teaching faculty.

Photo of Ken Johnson

Kenneth Johnson of the department of sociology will be the Class of 1940 Professor. This professorship, established in honor of the 50th reunion of the Class of 1940, recognizes a UNH faculty member for outstanding interdisciplinary teaching and research. Johnson is also a senior demographer at the Carsey School of Public Policy.

photo of Mary Stampone

Mary Stampone of the department of geography will be the
 Class of 1941 Professor. Established with a gift from that class, this award recognizes outstanding teaching, research or public service, especially from an international perspective.


Outstanding Teacher and Scholar

March 20, 2017

photo of Ellen Fitzpatrick

Ellen Fitzpatrick, professor of history, has been selected as the 2017 recipient of the Lindberg Award, given annually to the outstanding teacher-scholar in the College of Liberal Arts.

Professor Fitzpatrick was appointed to the UNH faculty in 1997 as associate professor after serving eight years on the faculty of Harvard. She previously taught at MIT and Wellesley. She earned her Ph.D. at Brandeis.

Professor Fitzpatrick specializes in modern American political and intellectual history. She is the author or editor of nine books. Her most recent book, “The Highest Glass Ceiling: Women’s Quest for the American Presidency” (Harvard UP, 2016) was excerpted in The New Yorker, selected as an Editor’s Choice by the New York Times and named a notable nonfiction book of 2016 by the Washington Post. Her previous book, “Letters to Jackie: Condolences from a Grieving Nation” (Ecco, 2010), was a New York Times bestseller and the basis of a highly regarded documentary film by Bill Couturie entitled “Letters to Jackie: Remembering President Kennedy.” Professor Fitzpatrick served as associate producer.

Professor Fitzpatrick’s recent scholarship has had broad public appeal, and she has fully embraced the role of public intellectual. She has been interviewed as an expert on modern American political history by the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, USA Today, the Boston Globe, the Washington Post, CBS’s Face the Nation, National Public Radio and has appeared frequently on the PBS News Hour. Within the last year, she has contributed opinion pieces to the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times and CNN online. Additionally, she is an active public speaker at museums, universities and other venues. In recognition of her tireless contributions to public discourse, she is a past recipient of UNH’s Award for Excellence in Public Service.

In addition to her vigorous scholarly activities, Professor Fitzpatrick dedicates herself every year to first-year students, expertly guiding them through a survey of modern U.S. history course, and to budding historians in the major gateway course. She is equally adept at teaching upper-level undergraduate and graduate seminars, as well as directing a number of theses and dissertations. According to colleagues, she is a creative and caring teacher, remembered by students, even many years later, for her particular eloquence and deep knowledge.

The annual Gary Lindberg Award was established by the College of Liberal Arts in 1986 in memory of Professor Gary Lindberg of the Department of English. As a means of publicly supporting superior faculty accomplishment, the College of Liberal Arts annually recognizes one truly outstanding scholar and teacher within the College. The recipient is invited to present a lecture to the public during the following academic year.


The Significance of Listening

March 7, 2017

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Paula M. Salvio, UNH professor of education, and co-authors Bronwen E. Low and Chloe Brushwood Rose, have published a new book titled “Community-based Media Pedagogies: Relational Practices of Listening in the Commons” (Routledge).

“Funded by the Canadian Social Science Humanities Research Council, this comparative study of community media projects began with an interest in the kinds of stories people were telling in community programs through participatory, multimedia forms,” explains Salvio. “What might these stories tell us about the complexities of experiences of migration, marginalization, mobility and identity for their participants?”

Salvio and her colleagues worked with three groups: recently immigrated women in a leadership program in Toronto working with digital storytelling, youth with refugee experience in Montreal who were part of the mappingmemories.ca project, and youth at the Centre for Urban Pedagogy in New York City who use digital media, art and design to make educational tools that demystify complex policy and planning issues in their communities.

“Following our observations, interviews and reflection, we realized that we needed to complement our attention to the experience of storytelling with an examination of listening,” says Salvio. “In the group processes in these and other programs, including ‘story circles,’ one spends far more time listening than speaking. We realized that part of the power of these projects lay in their cultivation of listening relations, which supported participants in taking social and emotional risks. And so we began exploring the pedagogical and social significance of listening, and the role it might play in building a democratic, educational ‘commons,’ by developing a theory of intersubjective listening. This theory moves beyond dialogue to take into consideration the fundamental interdependence of speaker and listener, as well as the political and ethical complexities of such a listening.”

Salvio’s research focuses on the cultural and historical foundations of education with a specialization in psychoanalysis, life-writing and the impact that marginalization, trauma and war have on women, children and youth in formal and informal educational settings.

“Community-based Media Pedagogies: Relational Practices of Listening in the Commons” is now available online and in print.


UNH Anthropologist Receives Fellowship to Establish Museum in Belize

March 3, 2017

photo of Eleanor Harrison-Buck

Eleanor Harrison-Buck, an associate professor of anthropology at UNH, has been awarded a $50,000 Whiting Public Engagement Fellowship to establish a public history museum in Belize that focuses on the Kriol (Creole) community.

More than a third of the population of Belize is part of the Kriol community descended from enslaved Africans brought to the country by Europeans in the 18th and 19th century.

“The legacy of British colonialism in Belize is strong: national school curricula, offerings at the national museum and a booming tourism market all tend to focus on the ancient Maya and colonial periods with little emphasis on the rich history and culture of the Kriol,” said Harrison-Buck. “I’ve conducted archaeological research in Belize for more than 25 years and helped to establish a temporary exhibit on Kriol culture last summer. It’s time there is a permanent record of this community.”

Harrison-Buck will work in collaboration with Kriol community leaders, educators, and local and regional authorities. The new museum, housed in a building donated by the town of Crooked Tree, will include local oral histories, artifacts, images and stories to present the culture to tourists, teachers and students.

Her research focuses on the classic Maya “collapse” period and subsequent Spanish and British colonial periods in Belize. Since 2009 she has directed the Belize River East Archaeology project, examining the history of the eastern watershed from preclassic to colonial times. Through her work she uncovered the history of the Kriol culture and heritage.

The Whiting Public Engagement Fellowship celebrates and supports faculty in the humanities who embrace public engagement as part of the scholarly vocation. She will receive a year-long leave to pursue this public-facing project and has secured external funding from the Alphawood Foundation of Chicago to help support the project costs. Harrison-Buck was one of eight humanities scholars around the country to receive the fellowship. The goal of every Whiting-funded project is to engage a public audience in the richness of the humanities.

Harrison-Buck was also awarded a UNH Center for the Humanities Publicly Engaged Humanities Fellowship for this project.

Source: Release by Erika Mantz, UNH Newsroom


Mary Schuh Receives Kennedy Public Policy Fellowship

February 23, 2017

photo of Mary Schuh

Mary Schuh, research associate professor of education and director of development and consumer affairs and the National Center on Inclusive Education at the UNH Institute on Disability, received the Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Foundation Public Policy Fellowship. This one-year fellowship is based in Washington, DC and prepares fellows for leadership roles in public policy at the state and national level.

“I welcome the challenge of gaining a deeper understanding of both the politics and the policies impacting the lives of individuals with disabilities and their families,” says Schuh. “The question I will continue to ask is: ‘How best can we preserve and promote innovative public policies that create welcoming and supportive communities?’  I hope to have a role in positively impacting the answer.”

During this one-year fellowship, Schuh will learn how federal legislation is initiated, developed, and passed by Congress, how programs are administered, and regulations promulgated by federal agencies. She will also be involved as the disability community works to shape public policy impacting people with disabilities and their families.

Since its founding in 1946, the Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Foundation has supported the creation of practical programs to benefit persons with intellectual disabilities, their families and their communities.

“I am so grateful to the Joseph P. Kennedy Foundation to have been selected to join the family of Kennedy Fellows and participate in what will probably be one of the most significant learning opportunities of my life,” shares Schuh.

edited from a longer article by Matt Gianino, Institute on Disability


UNH Political Scientist Named Visiting Scholar at Harvard

February 17, 2017

photo of Elizabeth Carter

Elizabeth Carter, assistant professor of political science, has been named a visiting scholar at the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies (CES) at Harvard University. She is currently in residence at the Center for the spring 2017 term.

At CES, Carter is working on her book project “For What it’s Worth: The Politics of Market Barriers in European Luxury Markets.” The project investigates linkages between political organization, market protection and value construction in luxury markets in France, Italy, Spain, Germany and the European Union. She is analyzing dynamics between trust and power across the supply chain, and their relationship to prices and perceived production quality.

Carter earned her Ph.D. in political science at the University of California Berkeley. She was a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies in Cologne, Germany. Her dissertation focused on producer organization and the creation of value in the French and Italian wine markets. Her current research interests include supply chain organization, regulatory politics and price theory.

This year, CES is hosting 25 social scientists from a range of disciplines who are carrying out innovative research on Europe while in residence at the Center. CES is the premier academic institution for the study of European history and culture, as well as for debate and discussion on contemporary Europe and its future role in world affairs.


New Book Examines Border Conflicts in North America

February 7, 2017

book cover

Laurence Armand French, senior researcher and affiliate professor of justice studies, has published a new book, co–written with Magdaleno Manzanarez, professor of political science at Western New Mexico University, titled “North American Border Conflicts: Race, Politics, and Ethics” (CRC Press, 2016).

“North American Border Conflicts” examines border conflicts from their beginnings at European settlement and aboriginal tribe contact to the ensuing colonial border battles, the emerging United States and its expansionist mandate, and the neocolonial conflicts of the 20th century. The book explores 21st century border issues such as post-9/11 policies that impact North American and Canadian border Indian tribes and the drug and human trafficking  concerns at the Mexico-U.S. border. “North American Border Conflicts” adds to the current discussion on class, race, ethnic and sectarian divides, not only within the United States but throughout the Americas in general. In an increasingly global world, the text offers insight into issues among and between neighboring nations.

The history and geopolitics explored by “North American Border Conflicts” are particularly pertinent at this moment in United States history as federal government concern over border security has increased.

“North American border issues are complex,” says French. “They cannot be easily dismissed by inflammatory rhetoric claiming simple solutions that will supposedly immediately change the landscape of interactions that extend to the beginning of U.S. independence.

“‘Nationalism’ is often associated with sectarian/ethnic elitism and is a dangerous foreign policy construct — look at the recent Balkan wars,” adds French. “Everyone who lives in this hemisphere is ‘American’ and if preference and consideration is given to any group, it should be the ‘indigenous’ Americans.”

French and Manzanarez have researched collaboratively for the past 20 years in the areas of international relations, social justice, and minority issues with a particular focus on indigenous Indian groups. In 2004, they co-authored “NAFTA and Neocolonialism: Comparative Criminal, Human, and Social Justice” (University Press of America).

“North American Border Conflicts: Race, Politics, and Ethics” is available from CRC Press and major online retailers.


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