New Book Examines Hollywood’s Hawaii

April 3, 2017

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Delia Malia Caparoso Konzett has published the first full-length study of the American film industry’s fascination with the Pacific in “Hollywood’s Hawaii: Race, Nation, and War.” The book is part of the War Culture Series from Rutgers University Press.

“Hollywood’s Hawaii” presents a history of cinema from 1898 to present that examines Hawaii and the Pacific and its representation in film in the context of colonialism, war, Orientalism, occupation, military buildup and entertainment.

“My family is from Hawaii and I’ve grown up in Hawaii partially,” says Konzett. “For my family, the representation of Hawaii in Hollywood always appeared at odds with the reality of our experiences. This discrepancy stirred my curiosity about Hollywood films set in the Pacific. My father, who also served in the military, steered my interest towards Pacific war films and I began to see two identities that Hollywood attached to Hawaii, namely a leisure paradise and a geopolitical site of military interest. My book tries to explore this complex relation between two seemingly contradictory identities and its relevance for the national imagination and its representation in Hollywood film.”

In “Hollywood’s Hawaii,” Konzett highlights films that mirror the cultural and political climate of the country — from the era of U.S. imperialism through Jim Crow racial segregation, the attack on Pearl Harbor and WWII, the civil rights movement, the contemporary articulation of consumer and leisure culture, as well as the buildup of the modern military industrial complex.

Gary Y. Okihiro, author of “Island World: Hawai`i and the United States,” writes of Konzett’s book:A marvelously comprehensive gaze at cinematic representations of Hawaii, this insightful study shows how those fictions constitute and are constituted by U.S. imperialism, Christian capitalism and white nationalism. Moreover, the imagined South Pacific is not a distant, fleeting pleasure but an imminent, durable presence.”

Konzett is associate professor of English, cinema and women’s studies at UNH. She is the author of “Ethnic Modernisms: Anzia Yezierska, Zora Neale Hurston, Jean Rhys, and the Aesthetics of Location” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2002).

“Hollywood’s Hawaii” is available from the publisher and major online retailers.


The Significance of Listening

March 7, 2017

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Paula M. Salvio, UNH professor of education, and co-authors Bronwen E. Low and Chloe Brushwood Rose, have published a new book titled “Community-based Media Pedagogies: Relational Practices of Listening in the Commons” (Routledge).

“Funded by the Canadian Social Science Humanities Research Council, this comparative study of community media projects began with an interest in the kinds of stories people were telling in community programs through participatory, multimedia forms,” explains Salvio. “What might these stories tell us about the complexities of experiences of migration, marginalization, mobility and identity for their participants?”

Salvio and her colleagues worked with three groups: recently immigrated women in a leadership program in Toronto working with digital storytelling, youth with refugee experience in Montreal who were part of the mappingmemories.ca project, and youth at the Centre for Urban Pedagogy in New York City who use digital media, art and design to make educational tools that demystify complex policy and planning issues in their communities.

“Following our observations, interviews and reflection, we realized that we needed to complement our attention to the experience of storytelling with an examination of listening,” says Salvio. “In the group processes in these and other programs, including ‘story circles,’ one spends far more time listening than speaking. We realized that part of the power of these projects lay in their cultivation of listening relations, which supported participants in taking social and emotional risks. And so we began exploring the pedagogical and social significance of listening, and the role it might play in building a democratic, educational ‘commons,’ by developing a theory of intersubjective listening. This theory moves beyond dialogue to take into consideration the fundamental interdependence of speaker and listener, as well as the political and ethical complexities of such a listening.”

Salvio’s research focuses on the cultural and historical foundations of education with a specialization in psychoanalysis, life-writing and the impact that marginalization, trauma and war have on women, children and youth in formal and informal educational settings.

“Community-based Media Pedagogies: Relational Practices of Listening in the Commons” is now available online and in print.


New Book Examines Border Conflicts in North America

February 7, 2017

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Laurence Armand French, senior researcher and affiliate professor of justice studies, has published a new book, co–written with Magdaleno Manzanarez, professor of political science at Western New Mexico University, titled “North American Border Conflicts: Race, Politics, and Ethics” (CRC Press, 2016).

“North American Border Conflicts” examines border conflicts from their beginnings at European settlement and aboriginal tribe contact to the ensuing colonial border battles, the emerging United States and its expansionist mandate, and the neocolonial conflicts of the 20th century. The book explores 21st century border issues such as post-9/11 policies that impact North American and Canadian border Indian tribes and the drug and human trafficking  concerns at the Mexico-U.S. border. “North American Border Conflicts” adds to the current discussion on class, race, ethnic and sectarian divides, not only within the United States but throughout the Americas in general. In an increasingly global world, the text offers insight into issues among and between neighboring nations.

The history and geopolitics explored by “North American Border Conflicts” are particularly pertinent at this moment in United States history as federal government concern over border security has increased.

“North American border issues are complex,” says French. “They cannot be easily dismissed by inflammatory rhetoric claiming simple solutions that will supposedly immediately change the landscape of interactions that extend to the beginning of U.S. independence.

“‘Nationalism’ is often associated with sectarian/ethnic elitism and is a dangerous foreign policy construct — look at the recent Balkan wars,” adds French. “Everyone who lives in this hemisphere is ‘American’ and if preference and consideration is given to any group, it should be the ‘indigenous’ Americans.”

French and Manzanarez have researched collaboratively for the past 20 years in the areas of international relations, social justice, and minority issues with a particular focus on indigenous Indian groups. In 2004, they co-authored “NAFTA and Neocolonialism: Comparative Criminal, Human, and Social Justice” (University Press of America).

“North American Border Conflicts: Race, Politics, and Ethics” is available from CRC Press and major online retailers.


UNH Political Scientist Publishes Two Books on United Nations

November 22, 2016

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Alynna Lyon, associate professor of political science, has written a book that explores the United States’ relationship to the United Nations. In “US Politics and the United Nations: A Tale of Dysfunctional Dynamics” (Lynne Rienner Publishers), Lyon examines the waxing and waning of U.S. support for the U.N., tracing events, actions and decisions from the end of World War I to the present.

U.S. Politics and the United Nations is available from the publisher and major online retailers.

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A second book, “The United Nations in the 21st Century” (5th edition, Westview Press), which Lyon co-authored with Karen A. Mingst and Margaret P. Karns, provides an introduction to the United Nations, exploring the historical, institutional and theoretical foundations of the U.N. This newest edition focuses on major trends since 2012, including changing power dynamics, increasing threats to peace and security, and the challenges of climate change.

“The United Nations in the 21st Century” is available from the publisher and major online retailers.


UNH Linguist Publishes 10th Book

November 21, 2016

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Rochelle Lieber, professor of English and linguistics, has released her 10th volume, “English Nouns: The Ecology of Nominalization” published by Cambridge University Press. The book explores English nominalizations, defined as complex nouns that are derived from verbs, adjectives and other nouns (for example, the noun “legalization” derives from the verb “legalize”).

Lieber uses data from Corpus of Contemporary American English to show that the syntactic patterns in which English nominalizations can be found and the range of possible readings they can express are very different from what has been claimed in past theoretical treatments. She argues that the relationship between form and meaning in the nominalization processes of English is virtually never one-to-one, but rather forms a complex web that can be likened to a derivational ecosystem.

“English Nouns: The Ecology of Nominalization” is available from the publisher and major online retailers.


New Book on Don Quixote Celebrates 400th Anniversary

November 18, 2016

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Carmen García de la Rasilla, associate professor of Spanish, and Jorge Abril Sánchez, lecturer in Spanish have teamed up to edit a new collection of essays on Miguel de Cervantes’ “Don Quixote,” celebrating the 400th anniversary of the publication of the novel’s second part.

“A Novel Without Boundaries: Sensing Don Quixote 400 Years Later,” published by Juan de la Cuesta, includes articles that examine “Don Quixote” in relation to major literary forms and genres such as novels of chivalry, the Alexandrian epic narrative and the genesis of detective fiction. Other articles explore how the novel has been transformed through different mediums and contexts over the centuries. The collection includes two essays by Rasilla.

The idea and content for the book grew out of an April 2015 UNH symposium that commemorated the 400th anniversary of the second part of Cervantes’ famous novel. A diverse group of experts, some of them internationally known for their work, gathered to discuss and share their research on “Don Quixote.”

“The positive, insightful, innovative and unique approaches to the subject brought by participants certainly proved the need and relevance of the conference, which re-opened the Cervantine text to new avenues of research and interpretation in the 21st century,” says Rasilla, who is pleased to be able to share these works widely now through “A Novel Without Boundaries.” Funding from the UNH Center for the Humanities and Class of ‘54 Enrichment Funds made the conference possible and facilitated the publication of the volume.

“A Novel Without Boundaries: Sensing Don Quixote 400 Years Later” is available at major online retailers.


Faculty Research: Water Concerns Unite NH Citizen Activists

August 2, 2016

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A Community Rights Movement Transcends Party, Age, and Gender

Associate professor of sociology Cliff Brown has published a research brief through the Carsey School of Public Policy that explores how citizens in three New Hampshire towns — Nottingham, Barrington and Barnstead — successfully united against a private water-bottling company, USA Springs, that would have pumped 400,000 gallons of water daily from the community groundwater. Commencing their fight in 2001, community activists eventually took their case to the State Supreme Court, and, along the way, developed and passed ground-breaking local ordinances in all three towns that prohibit corporations from taking community water. USA Springs eventually went bankrupt and the plant was never completed.

READ THE BRIEF


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