New Book Examines Border Conflicts in North America

February 7, 2017

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Laurence Armand French, senior researcher and affiliate professor of justice studies, has published a new book, co–written with Magdaleno Manzanarez, professor of political science at Western New Mexico University, titled “North American Border Conflicts: Race, Politics, and Ethics” (CRC Press, 2016).

“North American Border Conflicts” examines border conflicts from their beginnings at European settlement and aboriginal tribe contact to the ensuing colonial border battles, the emerging United States and its expansionist mandate, and the neocolonial conflicts of the 20th century. The book explores 21st century border issues such as post-9/11 policies that impact North American and Canadian border Indian tribes and the drug and human trafficking  concerns at the Mexico-U.S. border. “North American Border Conflicts” adds to the current discussion on class, race, ethnic and sectarian divides, not only within the United States but throughout the Americas in general. In an increasingly global world, the text offers insight into issues among and between neighboring nations.

The history and geopolitics explored by “North American Border Conflicts” are particularly pertinent at this moment in United States history as federal government concern over border security has increased.

“North American border issues are complex,” says French. “They cannot be easily dismissed by inflammatory rhetoric claiming simple solutions that will supposedly immediately change the landscape of interactions that extend to the beginning of U.S. independence.

“‘Nationalism’ is often associated with sectarian/ethnic elitism and is a dangerous foreign policy construct — look at the recent Balkan wars,” adds French. “Everyone who lives in this hemisphere is ‘American’ and if preference and consideration is given to any group, it should be the ‘indigenous’ Americans.”

French and Manzanarez have researched collaboratively for the past 20 years in the areas of international relations, social justice, and minority issues with a particular focus on indigenous Indian groups. In 2004, they co-authored “NAFTA and Neocolonialism: Comparative Criminal, Human, and Social Justice” (University Press of America).

“North American Border Conflicts: Race, Politics, and Ethics” is available from CRC Press and major online retailers.


UNH Political Scientist Publishes Two Books on United Nations

November 22, 2016

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Alynna Lyon, associate professor of political science, has written a book that explores the United States’ relationship to the United Nations. In “US Politics and the United Nations: A Tale of Dysfunctional Dynamics” (Lynne Rienner Publishers), Lyon examines the waxing and waning of U.S. support for the U.N., tracing events, actions and decisions from the end of World War I to the present.

U.S. Politics and the United Nations is available from the publisher and major online retailers.

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A second book, “The United Nations in the 21st Century” (5th edition, Westview Press), which Lyon co-authored with Karen A. Mingst and Margaret P. Karns, provides an introduction to the United Nations, exploring the historical, institutional and theoretical foundations of the U.N. This newest edition focuses on major trends since 2012, including changing power dynamics, increasing threats to peace and security, and the challenges of climate change.

“The United Nations in the 21st Century” is available from the publisher and major online retailers.


UNH Linguist Publishes 10th Book

November 21, 2016

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Rochelle Lieber, professor of English and linguistics, has released her 10th volume, “English Nouns: The Ecology of Nominalization” published by Cambridge University Press. The book explores English nominalizations, defined as complex nouns that are derived from verbs, adjectives and other nouns (for example, the noun “legalization” derives from the verb “legalize”).

Lieber uses data from Corpus of Contemporary American English to show that the syntactic patterns in which English nominalizations can be found and the range of possible readings they can express are very different from what has been claimed in past theoretical treatments. She argues that the relationship between form and meaning in the nominalization processes of English is virtually never one-to-one, but rather forms a complex web that can be likened to a derivational ecosystem.

“English Nouns: The Ecology of Nominalization” is available from the publisher and major online retailers.


New Book on Don Quixote Celebrates 400th Anniversary

November 18, 2016

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Carmen García de la Rasilla, associate professor of Spanish, and Jorge Abril Sánchez, lecturer in Spanish have teamed up to edit a new collection of essays on Miguel de Cervantes’ “Don Quixote,” celebrating the 400th anniversary of the publication of the novel’s second part.

“A Novel Without Boundaries: Sensing Don Quixote 400 Years Later,” published by Juan de la Cuesta, includes articles that examine “Don Quixote” in relation to major literary forms and genres such as novels of chivalry, the Alexandrian epic narrative and the genesis of detective fiction. Other articles explore how the novel has been transformed through different mediums and contexts over the centuries. The collection includes two essays by Rasilla.

The idea and content for the book grew out of an April 2015 UNH symposium that commemorated the 400th anniversary of the second part of Cervantes’ famous novel. A diverse group of experts, some of them internationally known for their work, gathered to discuss and share their research on “Don Quixote.”

“The positive, insightful, innovative and unique approaches to the subject brought by participants certainly proved the need and relevance of the conference, which re-opened the Cervantine text to new avenues of research and interpretation in the 21st century,” says Rasilla, who is pleased to be able to share these works widely now through “A Novel Without Boundaries.” Funding from the UNH Center for the Humanities and Class of ‘54 Enrichment Funds made the conference possible and facilitated the publication of the volume.

“A Novel Without Boundaries: Sensing Don Quixote 400 Years Later” is available at major online retailers.


Faculty Research: Water Concerns Unite NH Citizen Activists

August 2, 2016

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A Community Rights Movement Transcends Party, Age, and Gender

Associate professor of sociology Cliff Brown has published a research brief through the Carsey School of Public Policy that explores how citizens in three New Hampshire towns — Nottingham, Barrington and Barnstead — successfully united against a private water-bottling company, USA Springs, that would have pumped 400,000 gallons of water daily from the community groundwater. Commencing their fight in 2001, community activists eventually took their case to the State Supreme Court, and, along the way, developed and passed ground-breaking local ordinances in all three towns that prohibit corporations from taking community water. USA Springs eventually went bankrupt and the plant was never completed.

READ THE BRIEF


Chemist Humphry Davy Subject of UNH Historian’s New Book

May 6, 2016

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Professor of history and humanities Jan Golinski has published a new biography of the English chemist Sir Humphry Davy. In “The Experimental Self: Humphry Davy and the Making of a Man of Science” (University of Chicago Press), Golinski explores the ways in which Davy created and re-created his identity over the course of his life.

Davy (1778-1829) was the most famous British chemist of his day, known for discovering sodium, potassium, and other elements, and for inventions, including the Davy Lamp, used for mining safety. He built a career as a scientist before the profession itself even existed. Yet he was more than that.

“Davy was a glamorous individual who drew a lot of attention in his lifetime for his performances in public lectures and his writings. He was a chemist, a philosopher, a travel writer, a discoverer, and often thought of as an all-around ‘genius,’” says Golinski.

In “The Experimental Self,” Golinski sheds light on the many “selves” of Davy, arguing that Davy fashioned his identity through lifelong experimentation in selfhood.

A specialist in the history of science, Golinski is the author of “British Weather and the Climate of Enlightenment” and “Making Natural Knowledge: Constructivism and the History of Science,” both published by the University of Chicago Press, and of “Science as Public Culture: Chemistry and Enlightenment in Britain, 1760-1820,” published by Cambridge University Press.

To learn more about “The Experimental Self” and to order a copy, visit the publisher’s website or the websites of major online retailers.


Music Professor Publishes Book of Reviews on Classical Recordings

April 13, 2016

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Associate professor of music Rob Haskins has been a critic for “The American Record Guide” since 1993. In his newest book, “Classical Listening: Two Decades of Reviews from ‘The American Record Guide,'” he collects hundreds of his reviews for the Guide into one volume. “Classical Listening” provides record collectors, students and scholars, and the general public a resource for understanding the trajectory of classical music recordings over the last two decades.

Haskins, both musicologist and performer, is the author of “John Cage” (2012). He has recorded two CDs for Mode Records, John Cage’s “Two2” with pianist Laurel Karlik Sheehan and Marc Chan’s “My Wounded Head 3.”

Learn more.


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