Lecture to Address Crimes Against Humanity at IG Farben Auschwitz, Nov. 14

November 6, 2017

drawing of production site at Auchwitz

Martin Rumscheidt will speak about his experience as the son of a man complicit in Nazi crimes as part of the Heilbronner Lecture series on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017 at 5 p.m. in 115 Murkland Hall. The lecture, titled “White Collar Crimes Against Humanity: IG Farben Auschwitz, My Father’s Company,” is free and open to the public.

Rumscheidt is an ordained minister in the United Church of Canada and retired professor of historical theology at the University of Windsor, Halifax, Nova Scotia, and Charles University, Prague. He is the translator of “Act and Being” (1996) in Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works, English edition, and cotranslator with the late Barbara Rumscheidt of Soelle’s “Against the Wind” (1999) and “The Silent Cry” (2001).

Rumscheidt’s father was an employee of IG Farben, the chemical company and second largest producer in Hitler’s military-industrial complex. The senior Rumscheidt’s colleague and close friend Walter Dürrfeld was in charge of constructing and administering IG Farber Auschwitz-Monowitz, a production site that drew the majority of its workforce from the Birkenau concentration camp. Dürrfeld was sentenced to 8 years in prison by the Nuremberg court for his crimes, though he was released early. Rumscheidt’s father never addressed the implications of his work for IG Farben and its participation in the “extermination through labor” program the company implemented at Monowitz.

The Hans Heilbronner lecture series honors the memory of Hans Heilbronner, professor of history, who served the University of New Hampshire with distinction from 1954 until 1991. This event is sponsored by the Endowed Fund for Holocaust Education.

More information can be found at: https://cola.unh.edu/heilbronner2017


The Fiery Trial

October 11, 2017

Eric Foner photo

Eric Foner, renowned historian, will speak as part of the Rutman Distinguished Lecture Series on the American Presidency at the University of New Hampshire Monday, Oct. 23, 2017, at 7 p.m. in the Huddleston Hall Ballroom. His talk is titled The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and Slavery. The event is free and open to the public but registration is required.

Foner is one of America’s most prominent historians, writing and speaking widely on the intersections of intellectual, political and social history, and the history of American race relations. He is the author of over 20 books, including “The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery,” which won the Bancroft Prize, the Pulitzer Prize for History and The Lincoln Prize, among other awards. His 1988 book, “Reconstruction: America’s Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877,” won the Bancroft Prize, the Parkman Prize, and the Los Angeles Times Book Award, among others. Foner is DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University.

Housed in the College of Liberal Arts at UNH, the Rutman Distinguished Lecture Series on the American Presidency is generously supported by J. Morgan ’84 and Tara Rutman. The series focuses on American political history with an emphasis on the modern and historical context of the American presidency. The 2017 Rutman Lecture is part of Celebrate 150: The Campaign for UNH, celebrating 150 years of success at UNH and setting a bold course for the next 150 years.

For more information and to register, visit cola.unh.edu/eric-foner.


Scholarships Awarded for Study Abroad in Italy

May 4, 2017
Allison Hoey

Allison Hoey

Two students have received $4,000 scholarships from the COLA Fund for Study in Italy that will enable them to study abroad in programs of their choice in Italy.

Allison Hoey of Pelham, N.H., has always had a passion and interest in painting, but once she discovered art history, she realized that knowledge of history and context can have a big influence on an artist’s work. Currently a studio art major, she’s decided to pursue both a B.F.A. in painting and an art history major. Next she wants to experience art and its history first-hand in Italy. Hoey plans to study abroad in the spring 2018 semester and is currently considering her options, trying to decide among two institutions in Florence and one in Verona.

“Being surrounded by the work of influential artists will inspire my own work throughout the rest of my undergraduate career and beyond,” says Hoey.

History major Kelly Sheehan of Brockton, Mass., has loved history for as long as she can remember. It was in a history class in high school that she learned about the Renaissance, from whence sprang her second love: Italy and all things Italian. Now in her sixth semester of Italian at UNH, she couldn’t be happier:  except maybe if she were actually in Italy. Thanks to this scholarship, Sheehan will achieve that goal. She will attend the UNH-managed program on nutrition and culture in Ascoli Piceno, Italy, in summer 2017.

“To be able to stand and look at the things I have spent so long studying and learning about is surreal to me,” says Sheehan. “…I will be able to see firsthand some of the amazing monuments, statues and museums I have always dreamt of.”

The COLA Fund for Study in Italy supports UNH COLA students with a demonstrated interest in art, art history and Italian language who plan to study abroad in Italy. Awards are made to one or more students each spring. The Fund is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad and made possible through the generosity of a donor.


2017 Trout Scholars Named

April 19, 2017
photos of Trout scholars

from left to right: Camden Warren, Sierra Mullin, Andrew Jablonski

Three students have been awarded B. Thomas Trout scholarships to study abroad this year. Andrew Jablonski and Camden Warren were each awarded $2,500 to study in Dijon, France, for the 2017 fall semester. Sierra Mullin was awarded $1,000 to study in the 6-week Costa Rica program in summer 2017.

A junior from Newmarket, N.H., Jablonski is pursuing French, German and international affairs majors. French has been his passion since seventh grade, says Jablonski, who has been so dedicated to the language that he even took two advanced French courses at UNH while still a senior in high school. The leg up in coursework is part of what’s allowed him to fit three majors into his schedule.

“I am honored to represent the Trout Scholarship while in France, standing for what he [B. Thomas Trout] believed in about international studies as being an important part of a college career,” says Jablonski, “and also allowing me to reflect and further my understanding of the complications of the world, and how we can improve them.”

This is Jablonski’s second time winning the Trout Scholarship. Last year, the award helped him study in Berlin, Germany.

Warren is a junior history and international affairs dual major from Alton, N.H. His career ambition is to work with people of different nationalities and backgrounds both here in the U.S. and abroad. In order to achieve this goal, he’s convinced he has to supplement his classroom learning with experience in a foreign country.

“I have had the chance in the past to travel to historical sites here in the United States and I can confidently say that going to the places where momentous events in history occurred gives a much deeper and complete understanding not only for what happened there, but how those events have shaped and continue to shape our world today,” says Warren.

Warren has also received the Foley Jackson Award from UNH’s Center for International Education and Global Engagement. The scholarship will further support his Dijon study.

Mullin, a freshman Spanish major from Nashua, N.H., hopes her experience in Costa Rica will hone her cultural and language skills, providing a “jump-start” to her academic career and, eventually, her job prospects. Plus the extra credits she’ll earn on the program may even allow her to fit in a second major before she graduates, she says.

“Bettering my Spanish will help me get closer to achieving a personal goal of becoming fluent in Spanish,” says Mullin, who also looks forward to expanding her worldview through connecting with other U.S. students, Costa Rican students, and her host family.

The late B. Thomas Trout was a professor of political science and an associate dean in the College of Liberal Arts. Throughout his career, Professor Trout actively and tirelessly promoted international studies as a vital part of the college curriculum. He was equally dedicated to the development of study abroad programs for undergraduates, convinced that expanding the range of international study opportunities for American college students was integral to their understanding of a complicated world.

In Professor Trout’s honor, the College of Liberal Arts established the B. Thomas Trout Scholars Fund, which supports academically outstanding College of Liberal Arts undergraduates, allowing them to participate in a UNH-managed study abroad program in the College.


COLA Faculty Awarded Professorships

March 30, 2017

photo of Murkland courtyard

Five faculty members in the College of Liberal Arts have received professorship awards, effective July 2017.

University professorships are supported through the generosity of donors and awarded to faculty members who have demonstrated the highest levels of excellence in teaching, scholarship (including the creative arts) and service over an extended period of time. The UNH provost awards professorships based on nominations from deans. Each professorship carries a 3-year term.

photo of Michele Dillon

Michele Dillon of the department of sociology will be the Class of 1944 Professor. The award recognizes an outstanding faculty member.

photo of Kurk Dorsey

Kurk Dorsey of the department of history will be the Class of 1938 Professor. Established by alumni from that class, this award recognizes excellence in teaching.

photo of Nora Draper

Nora Draper of the communication department will be the Roland H. O’Neal Professor. Established by Virginia O’Neal in memory of her husband, who was a member of the UNH Class of 1934, this award recognizes an outstanding untenured member of the teaching faculty.

Photo of Ken Johnson

Kenneth Johnson of the department of sociology will be the Class of 1940 Professor. This professorship, established in honor of the 50th reunion of the Class of 1940, recognizes a UNH faculty member for outstanding interdisciplinary teaching and research. Johnson is also a senior demographer at the Carsey School of Public Policy.

photo of Mary Stampone

Mary Stampone of the department of geography will be the
 Class of 1941 Professor. Established with a gift from that class, this award recognizes outstanding teaching, research or public service, especially from an international perspective.


Outstanding Teacher and Scholar

March 20, 2017

photo of Ellen Fitzpatrick

Ellen Fitzpatrick, professor of history, has been selected as the 2017 recipient of the Lindberg Award, given annually to the outstanding teacher-scholar in the College of Liberal Arts.

Professor Fitzpatrick was appointed to the UNH faculty in 1997 as associate professor after serving eight years on the faculty of Harvard. She previously taught at MIT and Wellesley. She earned her Ph.D. at Brandeis.

Professor Fitzpatrick specializes in modern American political and intellectual history. She is the author or editor of nine books. Her most recent book, “The Highest Glass Ceiling: Women’s Quest for the American Presidency” (Harvard UP, 2016) was excerpted in The New Yorker, selected as an Editor’s Choice by the New York Times and named a notable nonfiction book of 2016 by the Washington Post. Her previous book, “Letters to Jackie: Condolences from a Grieving Nation” (Ecco, 2010), was a New York Times bestseller and the basis of a highly regarded documentary film by Bill Couturie entitled “Letters to Jackie: Remembering President Kennedy.” Professor Fitzpatrick served as associate producer.

Professor Fitzpatrick’s recent scholarship has had broad public appeal, and she has fully embraced the role of public intellectual. She has been interviewed as an expert on modern American political history by the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, USA Today, the Boston Globe, the Washington Post, CBS’s Face the Nation, National Public Radio and has appeared frequently on the PBS News Hour. Within the last year, she has contributed opinion pieces to the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times and CNN online. Additionally, she is an active public speaker at museums, universities and other venues. In recognition of her tireless contributions to public discourse, she is a past recipient of UNH’s Award for Excellence in Public Service.

In addition to her vigorous scholarly activities, Professor Fitzpatrick dedicates herself every year to first-year students, expertly guiding them through a survey of modern U.S. history course, and to budding historians in the major gateway course. She is equally adept at teaching upper-level undergraduate and graduate seminars, as well as directing a number of theses and dissertations. According to colleagues, she is a creative and caring teacher, remembered by students, even many years later, for her particular eloquence and deep knowledge.

The annual Gary Lindberg Award was established by the College of Liberal Arts in 1986 in memory of Professor Gary Lindberg of the Department of English. As a means of publicly supporting superior faculty accomplishment, the College of Liberal Arts annually recognizes one truly outstanding scholar and teacher within the College. The recipient is invited to present a lecture to the public during the following academic year.


UNH Hosts Pulitzer Prize Winning Journalist Bob Woodward Dec. 6

November 14, 2016

photo of Bob Woodward

Bob Woodward, renowned investigative journalist and author, will speak as part of the Rutman Distinguished Lecture Series on the American Presidency at the University of New Hampshire Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016, at 7 p.m. in the Granite State Room in the Memorial Union Building. His talk will focus on the age of the American presidency from Nixon to now. The event is free and open to the public but registration is required.

Woodward is an associate editor of The Washington Post, where he has worked since 1971. He has shared in two Pulitzer Prizes, first in 1973 for the coverage of the Watergate scandal with Carl Bernstein, and second in 2002 as the lead reporter for coverage of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

He has authored or coauthored 18 books, all of which have been national non-fiction bestsellers. Twelve of those have been #1 national bestsellers. His most recent book, “The Last of the President’s Men,” was published in October 2015.

Bob Schieffer of CBS News has said, “Woodward has established himself as the best reporter of our time. He may be the best reporter of all time.”

Gene Roberts, the former managing editor of The New York Times, has called the Woodward-Bernstein Watergate coverage, “maybe the single greatest reporting effort of all time.” In listing the all-time 100 best non-fiction books, Time Magazine has called “All the President’s Men” by Bernstein and Woodward “Perhaps the most influential piece of journalism in history.”

Housed in the College of Liberal Arts at UNH, the Rutman Distinguished Lecture Series on the American Presidency is generously supported by J. Morgan ’84 and Tara Rutman. The series focuses on American political history with an emphasis on the modern and historical context of the American presidency. The 2016 Rutman Lecture is part of Celebrate 150: The Campaign for UNH, celebrating 150 years of success at UNH and setting a bold course for the next 150 years.

Celebrate 150 logo


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