Passing: Professor Emeritus John Shotter

December 12, 2016

photo of John Shotter

Remembrance by John Lannamann, associate professor of communication:

We received the sad news that our former colleague and good friend John Shotter died at his home in Whittlesford, England. John came to the Communication Department in 1991 and served as chair of the department from 1999 until 2001. He retired from UNH in 2004.

John was a prolific scholar and an extremely humble person. Although hired as a full professor, we were obliged to wait out the mandatory two-year period before presenting his case for tenure. One of his letter writers, Jerome Bruner, was incredulous that we would put someone with John’s record through such a process. He was right, but John would be the last to remind us of that fact. At the time, John had well over 100 publications appearing in a broad range of journals spanning many disciplines. Without the benefit of an institutionally mandated C.V., we’ve now lost count of his publication record since leaving UNH, but we know from following his work that the pace has kept up. Just last month, he published his most recent book, “Speaking, Actually: Towards a New ‘Fluid’ Common-Sense Understanding of Relational Becomings.” That book completes a life-long project that began with “Images of Man in Psychological Research” in 1975. In each of his nine subsequent books, he continued to upset our standard assumptions about how to study humans.

We’ll miss John. He was a good friend and a generous colleague who was at home in the Communication Department but kept ties with his original discipline of psychology while reaching out to kindred spirits in philosophy, sociology, anthropology and education. The College of Liberal Arts was fortunate to have him with us.

Professor Shotter was professor emeritus of communication. He passed away on December 8, 2016.


Passing: Earl C. Hagstrom

October 25, 2016

hagstromearl300

Professor Earl C. Hagstrom died peacefully on October 16, 2016 at the age of 88. Earl was a faculty member in the Department of Psychology from 1965 until 1994. He graduated from Tufts University in 1952 and received his Ph.D. from Brown University in 1957. His graduate work with Carl Pfaffmann included some of the first systematic studies of the activity of taste fibers in the chorda tympani nerve. Earl held faculty positions at Princeton and Columbia Universities and conducted post-doctoral research at the Medical College of Virginia. He joined the faculty at the University of New Hampshire in 1965 just as the doctoral program in psychology was starting up. Earl was one of the earliest faculty members at UNH in the neurosciences. He continued to study gustatory physiology in several species and later branched out to examine EEG activity to understand the neural basis of cognitive function in human subjects. He was a popular and well-respected teacher, renown for his ability to hold pieces of chalk in both hands and simultaneously sketch anatomical structures in the left and right hemispheres of the brain. Earl served as Chair of the Psychology Department in the mid 1980s. As Chair he successfully negotiated challenging transitions as the department moved out of antiquated facilities in Conant Hall into temporary quarters in wood frame houses and then back into the newly renovated Conant Hall. Earl will be remembered for his many contributions to the Psychology Department as it grew to serve the largest undergraduate major at UNH and a graduate program with a long history of success preparing future faculty for colleges and universities across the country.

SERVICES: He will be laid to rest in a private family service. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to The Leukemia And Lymphoma Society, 9 Erie Dr., Natick, Mass., 01760.

Read obituary published in seacoastonline.

This post was written by Robert Mair, UNH Professor of Psychology


Passing: Murray A. Straus

May 17, 2016
Murray A. Straus

Murray A. Straus

By David Finkelhor, UNH Professor of Sociology:

Murray Straus, an internationally influential former professor of sociology at the University of New Hampshire and founder of the field of family violence research, died May 13, 2016 at the age of 89.

Beginning in the 1970s, his surveys established that people were far more likely to be assaulted and injured by members of their own family than they were by strangers, fundamentally changing popular and academic conceptions about crime and crime prevention.

He devoted much of his later career to the study of spanking and corporal punishment, accumulating evidence that spanking was associated with increased subsequent aggression among children and reduced warmth between them and their parents, among other negative side effects.

He pioneered techniques for getting information about sensitive topics such as being the victim or perpetrator of family violence in national household and telephone surveys. His Conflict Tactics Scale, which he revised over the years, became the standard approach for gathering information about child and spouse abuse and one of the more widely used instruments in social science.

His findings led him to the conclusion that, although women suffered more serious consequences than men from domestic aggression, women perpetrated a considerable amount of violence in intimate relationships that also needed to be addressed in public policy if families were to be made safe.

Early in his career he specialized in rural sociology and the measurement of family interaction.

He became interested in family violence as a result of planning a meeting of the National Council of Family Relations in Chicago, Illinois, in 1968 in the wake of police brutality there at the Democratic Convention.

He decided that to engage with the issues of the day, they needed to assemble a panel on the connection between families and societal violence. He went on to show that people exposed to violence in their families of origin were considerably more likely to engage in violence as adults and to support public policies such as capital punishment and military intervention.

He was of the opinion that spanking, even when used in moderation, taught that hitting and violence were appropriate and even necessary responses when a person believed someone else’s misbehavior needed correction. He concluded, based on his research, that parents should be taught to never spank children. He strongly endorsed and provided much of the scientific evidence to back efforts to ban corporal punishment, a ban which has been adopted by more than four dozen countries.

Straus spent most of his career, from 1968 until his death, at UNH, much of it as director of the Family Research Laboratory, after previous positions at Washington State University, University of Wisconsin, Cornell and the University of Minnesota. He received his bachelor’s and doctoral training at the University of Wisconsin.

He was an energetic and prolific scholar, authoring 15 books and hundreds of scholarly articles. Among the most widely cited were “Behind Closed Doors” and “Beating the Devil Out of Them.”

He was also a devoted teacher who trained and mentored dozens of scholars, including many of the current luminaries in the field of family violence, as director for 30 years of a post-doctoral fellowship program funded by the National Institute of Mental Health.

He served as president of the Society for the Study of Social Problems, the National Council on Family Relations and the Eastern Sociological Society and was active in numerous other academic organizations.

He was the recipient of many awards, including from the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children, the National Association of Social Workers and the American Sociological Association.

He was known as a warm and engaging person who enjoyed collaborating with colleagues and supervising students. He assembled two large international consortia, involving dozens of scholars in more than 30 countries to conduct cross-national comparative surveys on dating violence and parental disciplinary practices.

Straus was born in New York City on June 18, 1926, to Samuel and Kathleen (Miller) Straus.

He is survived by his wife, Dorothy Dunn Straus; his children by a previous marriage, Carol Straus and Dr. John Straus; his stepchildren David Dunn and wife Kathy, Lisa Dunn, Thomas Dunn and wife Linda; and many grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

A memorial to commemorate his life and work is planned for July 11 in conjunction with the International Conference on Family Violence and Child Victimization Research to be held at the Portsmouth Sheraton. All members of the community are welcome.

Contributions in his memory may be made to the Family Research Lab Projects Fund, with checks made out to UNH Foundation and referencing Murray Straus, and mailed to:

Family Research Lab Projects Fund
c/o UNH Foundation
9 Edgewood Road
Durham, NH 03824

Article source: UNH Today


Memorial Service for Paul Brockelman Announced

April 21, 2016
painting

Portrait of Paul Brockelman painted by Adeline Goldminc-Tronzo

A memorial service and reception for professor emeritus of philosophy Paul Brockelman will be held on Sunday, May 15 at 4 PM at the 3 Chimneys Inn in Durham NH.

Please RSVP to Mira Brockelman at miramirab@gmail.com by April 30, 2016.

Paul Brockelman, who taught philosophy at UNH from 1963-2001, died Jan. 8, 2016. He served as coordinator of the UNH religious studies program from 1979 to 1996 and was founding director of the Master of Arts in liberal studies program. Brockelman received the College of Liberal Arts (COLA) Distinguished Teaching Award in 1986 and the COLA Gary Lindberg Award for Excellence in Teaching and Research in 1997. More information on his time at UNH can be read here.


Memorial Service: Jean Kennard, Professor Emerita of English

April 7, 2016

Jean Kennard

Jean Elizabeth Kennard, UNH professor emerita of English, died March 26, 2016 at the Laconia Rehabilitation Center in Laconia of pneumonia. She was 79. Her life partner of 39 years, Susan Schibanoff, was at her side.

During her tenure at UNH, Kennard authored four books and numerous articles on Victorian literature and modern British fiction, with specialty areas in women’s literature, the literature of World War 1, and GLBT studies. She also taught undergraduate and graduate courses on these subjects, including the first course on women’s literature at UNH. She was the first female chair of the English Department (1978-1981) and its first female tenured full professor. She received the 1986-1987 University Distinguished Teaching Award; the 1992-1993 Kidder Fund Tolerance Award for Faculty; and the 1999-2000 University Distinguished Professor Award. More.

A memorial service will be held Sunday, May 22, at 1 p.m., in the ballroom at the Holiday Inn, located at 172 North Main St. in Concord, N.H. A reception will follow.

Memorial donations may be made to the New Hampshire Humane Society, an animal shelter or rescue organization of your choice, or sponsor a student at Bridge International Academies: http://www.bridgeinternationalacademies.com/sponsorship/sponsor-a-pupil/


A Celebration of the Life of Arlene Kies Announced

April 5, 2016

Arlene Kies

A Celebration of the Life of Arlene P. Kies will be held on Sunday, May 29, 2016 at 3 p.m. in the Johnson Theatre of the Paul Creative Arts Center. The University community and the public are invited to attend. Arlene’s family asks those who will attend to please RSVP by sending an email to: arlenekiesservice@gmail.com.  There will be a reception following the Celebration and the RSVP will help in the planning of this reception.

Arlene Kies was a Murkland Lecturer in the Department of Music for 20 years, where she was a tireless piano teacher and performer. She died peacefully at home on February 11, 2016, following a two-year battle with cancer.

More.


Memorial Service: Marion James

October 1, 2015

photo of Marion James

Professor Emerita of History Marion E. James passed away on September 21, 2015. Please read her memorial page here, which notes the many accomplishments Professor James achieved in her 97 years.

A celebration of Professor James’s life will be held at the University of New Hampshire on Friday, October 16, at 4:00, in Richards Auditorium (115 Murkland Hall). A reception will directly follow, from 4:30-5:30, in the Office of the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts (110 Murkland Hall).

Visitor parking is available at the Edgewood Road Visitor Lot (paystation payment required). Full parking information is available at http://www.unh.edu/transportation/visitor-parking.

This event is supported by the James Trust. The celebration and service are open to the public.


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