Caves of Dunhuang

November 2, 2017

men praying

The University of New Hampshire will host an exhibition of the caves at Mogao, a top United Nations World Heritage Site located in Dunhuang, China, Nov. 13-17, 2017, in Huddleston Hall. The site is famous for its caves featuring statues and wall paintings spanning 1,000 years of Buddhist art.

The exhibit is free and open to the public Nov. 13 from 4:40-8 p.m.; Nov. 14-16 from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Nov. 17 from 10 a.m.-noon.

Dunhuang was at the crossroads of trade, cultures, ethnicities and religions along the ancient Silk Road from 300 BCE to about 1400 CE. Approximately 700 caves were hollowed out along a mile-long stretch that housed thousands of square feet of ancient murals and colored Buddhist statues, as well as tens of thousands of ancient scrolls, paintings, religious texts/sutra and government documents. The caves offer a rare glimpse into the lives of the diverse people who traveled along the ancient Silk Road.

The exhibition at UNH includes photos, multimedia, and original-scale replicas of dozens of murals and the entirety of Cave 285, a painstakingly recreated work of art in its own right. The cave contains images of Chinese and Indian deities and a visualization of a tale of Buddhist redemption known as the “500 Robbers.” The replicas are the work of artists and scholars from the Dunhuang Research Academy, the institution responsible for the conservation, management and research of the World Heritage Site.

Two lectures will accompany the exhibition:

“The Art of Dunhuang” by Huaqing Luo, deputy director of Dunhuang Research Academy, will take place Nov. 13, 2017, from 2-3 p.m. in the Memorial Union Building Theatre II.

“The Murals of Dunhuang” by Yige Wang, co-director of the Confucius Institute at UNH; Brian Chu, UNH professor of art; and Julee Holcombe, UNH associate professor of art; will take place Nov. 16, 2017, from 12:30-1:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union Building’s Granite State Room.

The exhibition is sponsored by the Confucius Institute at UNH and made possible by Hanban (Confucius Institute Headquarters), Dunhuang Research Academy, the UNH College of Liberal Arts, Bryant University and Chengdu University.

Photo: Worshipping Bodhisattva, mural, Cave 285, Wei Dynasty (535-556 A.D.)


COLA Staff Members Win UNH Presidential Awards of Excellence

May 17, 2017
photos of Chris Clement and 4 award winners

(L to R) Carla Cannizzaro, Amanda Stone, Marlene Brooks, Chris Clement and Avary Thorne

Hundreds of UNH employees were recognized for their talents and dedication during a staff recognition ceremony May 5 in the MUB’s Granite State Room. In addition, five staff members were awarded the university’s highest staff honor — the Presidential Award of Excellence. Among the five were two staff members from the College of Liberal Arts: Carla Cannizzaro of the Department of English and Avary Thorne of the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

“These recipients are the human faces behind our success across UNH,” said Christopher Clement, vice president for finance and administration. “They demonstrate excellence every day.”

University community members nominate colleagues for the Presidential Award of Excellence. A committee of judges selects five nominees whose outstanding work has contributed to the goals of the UNH Strategic Plan to receive the award.

Read the citations that Clement read about Cannizzaro and Thorne.

This post was edited from a longer story in UNH Today.


2017 Trout Scholars Named

April 19, 2017
photos of Trout scholars

from left to right: Camden Warren, Sierra Mullin, Andrew Jablonski

Three students have been awarded B. Thomas Trout scholarships to study abroad this year. Andrew Jablonski and Camden Warren were each awarded $2,500 to study in Dijon, France, for the 2017 fall semester. Sierra Mullin was awarded $1,000 to study in the 6-week Costa Rica program in summer 2017.

A junior from Newmarket, N.H., Jablonski is pursuing French, German and international affairs majors. French has been his passion since seventh grade, says Jablonski, who has been so dedicated to the language that he even took two advanced French courses at UNH while still a senior in high school. The leg up in coursework is part of what’s allowed him to fit three majors into his schedule.

“I am honored to represent the Trout Scholarship while in France, standing for what he [B. Thomas Trout] believed in about international studies as being an important part of a college career,” says Jablonski, “and also allowing me to reflect and further my understanding of the complications of the world, and how we can improve them.”

This is Jablonski’s second time winning the Trout Scholarship. Last year, the award helped him study in Berlin, Germany.

Warren is a junior history and international affairs dual major from Alton, N.H. His career ambition is to work with people of different nationalities and backgrounds both here in the U.S. and abroad. In order to achieve this goal, he’s convinced he has to supplement his classroom learning with experience in a foreign country.

“I have had the chance in the past to travel to historical sites here in the United States and I can confidently say that going to the places where momentous events in history occurred gives a much deeper and complete understanding not only for what happened there, but how those events have shaped and continue to shape our world today,” says Warren.

Warren has also received the Foley Jackson Award from UNH’s Center for International Education and Global Engagement. The scholarship will further support his Dijon study.

Mullin, a freshman Spanish major from Nashua, N.H., hopes her experience in Costa Rica will hone her cultural and language skills, providing a “jump-start” to her academic career and, eventually, her job prospects. Plus the extra credits she’ll earn on the program may even allow her to fit in a second major before she graduates, she says.

“Bettering my Spanish will help me get closer to achieving a personal goal of becoming fluent in Spanish,” says Mullin, who also looks forward to expanding her worldview through connecting with other U.S. students, Costa Rican students, and her host family.

The late B. Thomas Trout was a professor of political science and an associate dean in the College of Liberal Arts. Throughout his career, Professor Trout actively and tirelessly promoted international studies as a vital part of the college curriculum. He was equally dedicated to the development of study abroad programs for undergraduates, convinced that expanding the range of international study opportunities for American college students was integral to their understanding of a complicated world.

In Professor Trout’s honor, the College of Liberal Arts established the B. Thomas Trout Scholars Fund, which supports academically outstanding College of Liberal Arts undergraduates, allowing them to participate in a UNH-managed study abroad program in the College.


New Book on Don Quixote Celebrates 400th Anniversary

November 18, 2016

book cover

Carmen García de la Rasilla, associate professor of Spanish, and Jorge Abril Sánchez, lecturer in Spanish have teamed up to edit a new collection of essays on Miguel de Cervantes’ “Don Quixote,” celebrating the 400th anniversary of the publication of the novel’s second part.

“A Novel Without Boundaries: Sensing Don Quixote 400 Years Later,” published by Juan de la Cuesta, includes articles that examine “Don Quixote” in relation to major literary forms and genres such as novels of chivalry, the Alexandrian epic narrative and the genesis of detective fiction. Other articles explore how the novel has been transformed through different mediums and contexts over the centuries. The collection includes two essays by Rasilla.

The idea and content for the book grew out of an April 2015 UNH symposium that commemorated the 400th anniversary of the second part of Cervantes’ famous novel. A diverse group of experts, some of them internationally known for their work, gathered to discuss and share their research on “Don Quixote.”

“The positive, insightful, innovative and unique approaches to the subject brought by participants certainly proved the need and relevance of the conference, which re-opened the Cervantine text to new avenues of research and interpretation in the 21st century,” says Rasilla, who is pleased to be able to share these works widely now through “A Novel Without Boundaries.” Funding from the UNH Center for the Humanities and Class of ‘54 Enrichment Funds made the conference possible and facilitated the publication of the volume.

“A Novel Without Boundaries: Sensing Don Quixote 400 Years Later” is available at major online retailers.


On the Trail of Witches

October 27, 2016

photo of Jorge Abril Sanchez

excerpted/edited from a longer piece by Jennifer Saunders

Goblins, ghosts, werewolves, witches. At this time of year, those words conjure images of Halloween and favorite scary stories.

For one member of the UNH faculty, however, research into the folklore and fears of the past has attracted the attention of Smithsonian.com. Jorge Abril Sánchez, a lecturer in Spanish in the department of languages, literatures, and cultures, was contacted over the summer by a Smithsonian reporter to share his expertise for an article on the Basque country in Spain, the site of the largest witch trial in world history.

In Spain over a five-year period in the early 1600s, more than 7,000 people were accused of witchcraft, at least 2,000 were “examined” — with many of those investigations involving torture — and 11 lost their lives.

Abril Sánchez confirms there are some similarities between what happened in the Salem, Mass. witch trials and what happened in Spain. In both instances, children played a key role, with many manipulated to retaliate against familial enemies. And, in Spain and Salem, anyone who did not fit the mold of the ruling religion or government was at risk for persecution.

There were differences, however.  In Spain, he notes, there were defenders within the church who were skeptical about the accusations. Of the more than 7,000 accused, six were killed while five died in jail before all 11 were eventually pardoned — compared to Salem, where 20 people of the 200 accused were killed.

Read the full story in UNH Today.

 


2016 University Student Award Winners

May 20, 2016

Each spring, university-wide, competitive achievement awards are given to only a dozen or so of the most accomplished and impressive undergraduates at UNH. This year, seven liberal arts students won awards.

An award ceremony to honor these students was held on May 10.

Eden Suoth

The Alumni Meritorious Service Award Association Prize was given to Eden Suoth, a mechanical engineering and philosophy double major from Rochester, N.H. The award is given to a graduate who renders meritorious service to the University or its alumni organizations through faithful and continued effort in maintaining class or other alumni organizations, through active participation in alumni or University affairs, and/or by assisting and expanding the usefulness, influence and prestige of the University. Eden is pictured here with one of his nominators, Professor Willem deVries.


Brittany Marien

The Class of 1899 Prize was awarded to Brittany Marien, a political science and international affairs dual major from Lincoln, N.H. The award recognizes a senior who has developed the highest ideals of good citizenship during his or her course of study. Brittany is pictured here with one of her nominators, Professor Chris Reardon.


Madison Lightfoot

The Dean Williamson Award went to Madison Lightfoot, a social work and women’s studies double major from Davisburg, Mich. This award recognizes the senior who has been outstanding and well-rounded in extracurricular activities, scholarship, athletics and loyalty to the University. Madison is pictured here with one of her nominators, Rev. Larry Brickner-Wood.


Ariel Pueyo Eninas

The Erskine Mason Award was given to Ariel Natalia Pueyo Encinas, a French and international affairs dual major from Cochambamba, Bolivia. This award recognizes that senior who is distinguished for most consistent progress and achievement. Ariel is pictured here with one of her nominators, Professor Claire-Lise Malarte-Feldman.


Krysta Gingue

The Governor Wesley Powell Award went to Krysta Gingue, a political science and international affairs dual major from Lyndonville, Vt. This award honors that undergraduate student who has an expressed interest in public service as demonstrated through his/her course of study and extra-curricular activities, both on and off campus. Krysta is pictured here with her nominator, Christine Zaimes of the TRIO Program.


Laura Rose Donegan

The UNH Award of Excellence was awarded to Laura Rose Donegan, a political science major from Melbourne, Australia. This award recognizes excellence in leadership, scholarship, and citizenship. Laura Rose is pictured here with two of her nominators, Professor Dante Scala (left) and Principal Lecturer Lionel Ingram (right).


Ross Conroy

The Hood Achievement Prize was awarded to Ross Conroy, a political science major from Berwick, Maine. This award recognizes that senior man who shows the greatest promise through character, scholarship, leadership and usefulness to humanity. Ross could not accept his award in person because he is studying abroad in Rwanda this semester. Professor Chris Reardon accepted it on his behalf.

Congratulations to all!

Photos by Randy Schroeder


Five Students Named 2016 Trout Scholars

April 27, 2016
B. Thomas Trout

B. Thomas Trout

Five New Hampshire students have been awarded B. Thomas Trout Scholarships from the College of Liberal Arts to support their study abroad experiences in the 2016-17 academic year.

The scholarship recipients are Jessica Gero, an English teaching and classics double major from Milton; Jess Hesse, a German major from Derry; Andrew Jablonski, a French major from Newmarket; RoseAlaina Leone, a psychology and anthropology double major from Walpole; and Carlos Martens, an English Journalism major from Newmarket.

The B. Thomas Trout Scholars Fund supports academically outstanding College of Liberal Arts undergraduates, allowing them to participate in UNH-managed study abroad programs in the College.

Learn more about the recipients.


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