UNH Awarded Federal Grant to Get STEM Teachers in Rural N.H. Schools

October 4, 2016

Thanks to a five-year $4.3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education, the University of New Hampshire will prepare and support 60 highly qualified elementary and secondary math and science teachers for rural, high-need New Hampshire schools beginning this summer.

“We are excited to bring our excellence in teacher preparation to the North Country,” said Leslie Couse, professor of education and department chair in the College of Liberal Arts. “Grant opportunities that focus on rural communities are rare. This grant will provide the means for deep clinical training during a year-long residency, a hallmark of high-quality teacher preparation and allow students to graduate with less debt, while becoming connected to the community.”

The University of New Hampshire Teacher Residency for Rural Education (UNH-TRRE) is a 15-month graduate level program designed to prepare elementary and secondary STEM teachers to teach in rural New Hampshire communities. It will support “residents” in learning, teaching, and living in rural NH communities. During their first summer, residents will take graduate coursework, observe in schools, and complete a community-based internship to learn about the resources of the communities in which they will teach. During the academic year, residents will complete a yearlong “residency” alongside an experienced master teacher in an elementary, middle, or high school classroom.

Residents will receive a living wage stipend and substantial scholarship during the program and will commit to teaching in a rural New Hampshire school for at least three years after graduation. Upon completion of the program, UNH-TRRE will continue to support its graduates during their first two years of teaching.

More.

 


Unearthing World History at Oyster River Middle School

December 16, 2015
students participating in mock dig

UNH student Joe Thibeault leads a group of seventh graders at Oyster River Middle School through a mock dig.

Earlier this month, UNH anthropology students, led by lecturer Marieka Brouwer Burg, created a mock excavation for seventh graders at Oyster River Middle School as part of the school’s world civilizations unit. The outreach program was “a big hit,” says Brouwer Burg.

Ninety Oyster River students participated in six teams. Each team had an excavation box, excavating tools and worksheets with which to explore, analyze and record artifacts using proper methods and techniques. The teams had to figure out which world culture they had unearthed in their boxes, based on what they had already learned about the artifacts of various early civilizations in their classes.

The activity was meant to be hands-on fun. Along the way, students learned quite a bit about the study of archaeology as well as the process of archaeological field and lab work.

“Students also learned about some of the misconceptions of archaeology – namely that archaeologists study people not dinosaurs, that we excavate to answer research questions and that we never sell artifacts,” says Brouwer Burg.

UNH students Maddy Moison, Chaya Sophon, Ashley Blum and Joe Thibeault prepared the materials for the dig and led the Oyster River students through the process. They also gave a presentation about the field of anthropology.

More pics here.


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