Recommencement

June 29, 2018

photo of Jessica Nadeau
Mostly, it was about the tassel. And her parents seeing her there on the field with the rest of her class on commencement day, celebrating the last four years and all the hard work that went into making it through them. And sharing the experience with her twin sister, Arianna, who had graduated from UNH Manchester two days earlier.

Jessica Nadeau ’18 missed it all. Just days before UNH’s May 19 commencement she was sidelined by a medical event. For the psychology and justice studies dual major, there was no throwing her cap in the air, no singing along to “Happy Trails,” no standing on her seat to search the crowd for her family.

And she was crushed.

But then, Joan Glutting, clinical associate professor of psychology, came up with an idea. She would hold a “recommencement” and invite Nadeau’s parents and sister to attend. She asked a couple of faculty members to join in. The response, she said, was incredible.

“I thought I’d get maybe three people. I got 15,” Glutting said.

So, she emailed Nadeau’s mother, Heidi Nadeau, and cemented the plan. Shortly before 3 p.m. on Monday, June 11, the family gathered under the arch at Thompson Hall where Styliani Munroe ’17 was waiting. Jessica Nadeau laughed as she hugged her friend and former classmate.

“It was hard to keep it a secret — we talk every day,” Munroe said. “I felt very sad for her when she couldn’t go to commencement. I’m so happy they could do this for her.”

As they stood there, one faculty member after another walked up until all 15 were assembled. Nadeau just kept grinning while her family looked on in awe. Her father, Serge Nadeau, took a minute to collect himself and then said, “The fact that UNH did this speaks volumes.”

“That they put this together for one student is so incredible,” Heidi Nadeau said. “She was devastated to miss graduation. Something as simple as being able to move your tassel over — you don’t realize how much these things mean.”

It seems Glutting did. She printed a program. There was a processional; Nadeau’s boyfriend and sister walked with her behind Barbara White, associate professor of occupational therapy, and Charles Putnam, co-director of Justiceworks. The other faculty members stood near the flagpole. Nadeau, her boyfriend and her sister stood shoulder to shoulder, facing the group.

“I am truly grateful and appreciative to all of the people that helped to create that moment for me,” the Auburn, New Hampshire, resident said after the ceremony. “There are not enough words to describe the happiness and joy that I felt. Having all of the faculty take time out of their busy days just to come to a ‘recommencement’ ceremony was incredibly humbling.”

During the ceremony, Glutting commended Nadeau for all her hard work. “You completed three internships while you were here. You got multiple job offers; you could have chosen a job that was a little safer, but you didn’t,” she said. (Nadeau starts work in July at Hampstead Hospital, a psychiatric hospital in Hampstead, New Hampshire.) “You embody all that a UNH student can be.”

She offered what she called a five-minute recap of commencement, citing remarks made by L.L. Bean Chairman Shawn Gorman ’89, this year’s speaker. A faculty member started the call-response “It’s a great day to be a Wildcat.” Senior vice provost of student life and dean of students Ted Kirkpatrick presented Nadeau with her diploma. Cristy Beemer, associate professor of English, led the group in singing the UNH alma mater.

And then, Nadeau turned her tassel.

Story written by Jody Record for UNH Today.


Career Minded

May 16, 2017

photo of Carrington Cazeau

Talk about plum assignments: When Boston native Carrington Cazeau ’17 went to Washington, D.C., for an internship with the U.S. Marshals Service, he was one of only four assigned to the Superior Court of the District of Columbia. “Not many people get to work there,” says Cazeau, who is planning a career in federal law enforcement. With majors in psychology and justice studies, he’ll graduate from the UNH College of Liberal Arts with a B.A. degree later this month.

Watch the video of Carrington’s journey:

Written by UNH Communications and Public Affairs  |  Photographer: Jeremy Gasowski  |  Videographer: Scott Ripley


Passing: John E. Limber

May 2, 2017
photo of John E. Limber

John E. Limber

John E. Limber, associate professor emeritus of psychology, passed away on April 26, 2017. A memorial service will be held on May 26, 2017 at 5 p.m. at Three Chimneys Inn in Durham.

On Wednesday, April 26, John Edward Limber died peacefully at his home in Durham, N.H., surrounded by his daughters, Kristin and Alexandra McGraw.

Born on Chicago’s South Side, John earned his undergraduate and honors graduate degrees at the University of Illinois, and was forever tied to the hapless Fighting Illini football and basketball teams. A win, at least every now and then, made John a happy member of Illini Nation.

In 1971, following post-doctoral work in psycholinguistics at Wesleyan University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, John became a member of the Department of Psychology of the University of New Hampshire, where he continued to teach undergraduate and graduate students and supervise their research until his retirement in 2009.

His graduate students became his lifelong friends and, especially in his later years, reminded him of the powerful influence he had on them, personally and professionally. A common refrain was that he taught, and led, by example.

John was also an innovator. At the beginning of each class and then periodically throughout the semester, he warned students that while all views were welcome, they needed to be data-based and cogently argued. He never tolerated, he said, “B.S.” He brought out a rubber stamp and a red ink pad and illustrated what he would add, as needed, to papers turned into him. Note: the rubber stamp did not use the abbreviation. Neither did John. Any number of students can testify that this was not an idle threat, but they can also testify that it was always done with charm and flair, to move their thinking along.

John’s views were not always taken as gospel by friends. For decades, John was an active member of the Psyclones — the slow-pitch softball team fielded by members of the psychology department. John was the team’s main pitcher, and for decades he insisted he was able to throw a slow-pitch curve ball. Knowledgeable people (including a former minor league major baseball pitcher) denied the very possibility of such a pitch. But John scoffed at skeptics, as he explained the physics of why the ball had to curve when released it just so!

John was a charter member of the “Applied Probability Group” in Durham — otherwise known as the monthly poker game. John was often the big winner of the night and at the last meeting he attended just a couple of months ago, he maintained his winning style.

John Limber was kind, nurturing, smart and pragmatic. His was a life well lived. At John’s core was his love of family. In the view of family and friends, John always found (and gave) the essentials: love, perspective, humor and kindness.

A memorial service to honor John’s life will be held at 5 p.m., May 26, 2017 at Three Chimneys Inn in Durham. His family and friends request that if you attend, you come with a story about John to share with the group. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in John’s name to a charity of your choice.

—Edited from a longer piece written by the Limber family


Passing: Earl C. Hagstrom

October 25, 2016

hagstromearl300

Professor Earl C. Hagstrom died peacefully on October 16, 2016 at the age of 88. Earl was a faculty member in the Department of Psychology from 1965 until 1994. He graduated from Tufts University in 1952 and received his Ph.D. from Brown University in 1957. His graduate work with Carl Pfaffmann included some of the first systematic studies of the activity of taste fibers in the chorda tympani nerve. Earl held faculty positions at Princeton and Columbia Universities and conducted post-doctoral research at the Medical College of Virginia. He joined the faculty at the University of New Hampshire in 1965 just as the doctoral program in psychology was starting up. Earl was one of the earliest faculty members at UNH in the neurosciences. He continued to study gustatory physiology in several species and later branched out to examine EEG activity to understand the neural basis of cognitive function in human subjects. He was a popular and well-respected teacher, renown for his ability to hold pieces of chalk in both hands and simultaneously sketch anatomical structures in the left and right hemispheres of the brain. Earl served as Chair of the Psychology Department in the mid 1980s. As Chair he successfully negotiated challenging transitions as the department moved out of antiquated facilities in Conant Hall into temporary quarters in wood frame houses and then back into the newly renovated Conant Hall. Earl will be remembered for his many contributions to the Psychology Department as it grew to serve the largest undergraduate major at UNH and a graduate program with a long history of success preparing future faculty for colleges and universities across the country.

SERVICES: He will be laid to rest in a private family service. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to The Leukemia And Lymphoma Society, 9 Erie Dr., Natick, Mass., 01760.

Read obituary published in seacoastonline.

This post was written by Robert Mair, UNH Professor of Psychology


UNH Psychologist Katie Edwards Receives Early Career Award

September 7, 2016

photo of Katie Edwards

Assistant professor of psychology Katie Edwards has received the 2016 Louise Kidder Early Career Award from The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. The selection committee cited Edwards’s commitment to both science and advocacy, and her work with underrepresented and marginalized groups as particularly impressive. They noted Edwards’s extensive record of publications and presentations, as well as her leadership at the state and national level on issues of sexual violence.

Edwards’s interdisciplinary program of research focuses broadly on better understanding the causes and consequences of interpersonal violence, primarily intimate partner violence and sexual assault among adolescents and young adults. Edwards uses this research data to develop, implement and evaluate prevention, intervention and policy efforts.

The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues is a group of over 3000 scientists from psychology and related fields who share a common interest in research on the psychological aspects of social and policy issues. The independent Society is also a division of the American Psychological Association.


Liberal Arts Students Awarded Gilman International Scholarships

August 10, 2016
ulia Krank ’17 (left) and Patrick Sullivan ’17 (right)

Julia Krank ’17 (left) and Patrick Sullivan ’17 (right)

UNH College of Liberal Arts (COLA) students Julia Krank ’17, a dual psychology and justice studies major, and Patrick Sullivan ’17, a dual sociology and justice studies major, are two of approximately 850 American undergraduate students from 324 colleges and universities across the U.S. selected to receive the prestigious Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Both Krank and Sullivan will be studying abroad this fall semester through the UNH COLA-managed justice studies program in Budapest, Hungary, that allows students to deepen their knowledge of modern European justice systems. Gilman scholars receive up to $5,000 to apply towards their study abroad or internship abroad costs. UNH student Kimberly Lavoie ’18, a wildlife and conservation biology major, also received a Gilman Scholarship.

UNH students can receive support on their Gilman applications from the Office of National Fellowships. For more information, contact Laura Perille.


Five Students Named 2016 Trout Scholars

April 27, 2016
B. Thomas Trout

B. Thomas Trout

Five New Hampshire students have been awarded B. Thomas Trout Scholarships from the College of Liberal Arts to support their study abroad experiences in the 2016-17 academic year.

The scholarship recipients are Jessica Gero, an English teaching and classics double major from Milton; Jess Hesse, a German major from Derry; Andrew Jablonski, a French major from Newmarket; RoseAlaina Leone, a psychology and anthropology double major from Walpole; and Carlos Martens, an English Journalism major from Newmarket.

The B. Thomas Trout Scholars Fund supports academically outstanding College of Liberal Arts undergraduates, allowing them to participate in UNH-managed study abroad programs in the College.

Learn more about the recipients.


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