Talking Art at the Capitol

April 14, 2017
Nancy Pelosi addressing advocates

Raina Ames snaps a cell phone shot during Nancy Pelosi’s address at Arts Advocacy Day in Washington, D.C.

Thirty-six delegates from the Educational Theatre Association (EdTA), representing sixteen states, attended Arts Advocacy Day in Washington, D.C., last month, among them Raina Ames, associate professor of theatre at UNH. Ames is a member of the Association’s New Hampshire board and one of only five members nationally to receive the EdTA’s Hawkins Award this year. The $1,000 award is intended to encourage member advocacy efforts by defraying the cost of attending the annual event.

The 2017 Arts Advocacy Day, sponsored by Americans for the Arts, had record attendance, convening more than 700 people from cultural, civic and grassroots organizations across the country to push for strong public policies and financial support for the arts. The advocates were welcomed on Capitol Hill by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, among others, and met with State legislators to discuss the importance of the arts.

“People from both sides of the political divide have a stake in saving the arts, and that was so uplifting,” says Ames, who directs the theatre education program at UNH.

For Ames, one of the highlights of the experience was civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis’ address to the advocates.

“It was inspiring to see that after all he has been through, his integrity and sense of social justice still emanate from his entire being. If John Lewis could survive all that he has in his life and remain a stalwart defender of what is right, I can go visit my four state legislators and talk about the arts!”

The Educational Theatre Association is a national nonprofit organization with approximately 100,000 student and professional members dedicated to shaping lives through theatre education.


Get to the Greek

February 22, 2017

actors on stage

It’s been 10 years since Greco pillars have graced the Johnson Theatre stage in the way they will this weekend when actors from three University System of New Hampshire schools will stage The Oedipus Cycle: A USNH Collaboration.

Students from Keene State College, Plymouth State University and the University of New Hampshire will bring some of the Greek’s finest characters to life in five separate productions in Durham, starting with UNH’s presentation of  “Oedipus at Colonus” Feb. 22, 23 and 26. PSU will present “Oedipus the King” on Feb. 24, and KSC will stage “Antigone” on Feb. 25. Show times and ticket information

It’s been a decade since the three schools’ theatre departments have collaborated on a Greek trilogy; in 2007, they brought “Electra,” “Women of Troy” and “Agamemnon” to Johnson Theatre. This weekend’s productions celebrate the 10-year anniversary of that collaboration while revisiting the lives of other beloved Greek characters whose timeless stories still resonate.

The UNH troupe will hit the road early next month to bring “Oedipus at Colonus” to KSU audiences March 3 and PSU March 9.

Post written by Tracey Bentley, UNH Communications and Public Affairs.

 


This Was A Really Bad Idea

October 11, 2016

graphic of David Kaye's face in center of a black hole

David Kaye, UNH professor of theatre, will deliver the College of Liberal Arts Lindberg Lecture entitled “This Was A Really Bad Idea: Life Vs. Theatre and the Creative Abyss.” The lecture will take place on Friday, October 21, from 2:30-3:30 p.m., with a reception from 2:00-2:30 p.m. Both events will be held in Murkland 110.

David Kaye was selected as the 2016 recipient of the Lindberg Award, given annually to the outstanding teacher-scholar in the College of Liberal Arts. Professor Kaye’s scholarly and creative work focuses on acting, directing, playwriting and applied theatre. He deftly produces, directs and performs a wide range of material, from the ancient Greeks to contemporary works, at UNH and for equity and non-equity companies regionally. Professor Kaye’s excellence in the classroom has been recognized with a UNH Excellence in Teaching Award and the Leonidas A. Nickole Theatre Educator of the Year Award from the New England Theatre Conference. He also won the University Social Justice Award in 2010 and the Outstanding Associate Professor Award in 2012.


David Kaye Named 2016 Lindberg Award Recipient

March 2, 2016

David Kaye

David Kaye, professor of theatre, has been selected as the 2016 recipient of the Lindberg Award, given annually to the outstanding teacher-scholar in the College of Liberal Arts.

Professor Kaye earned a B.S. at Castleton State College and an M.F.A. in acting at Brandeis University. He was appointed to the UNH faculty in 1996.

Professor Kaye’s scholarly and creative work focuses on acting, directing, playwriting and applied theatre. He deftly produces, directs and performs a wide range of material, from the ancient Greeks to contemporary works, at UNH and for equity and non-equity companies regionally. As a playwright, Kaye’s most recent endeavor has been a one-man tragi-comedy, which he also performs, titled “How I Brought Peace to the Middle East.” Based on his experiences as a Fulbright Scholar in Israel, the play had two successful runs in Portsmouth and was selected for inclusion in a juried festival of one-person plays on Broadway. Kaye’s innovative work often involves collaboration across cultures, disciplines and even geographic locales, such as his 2013 multi-media production “Estranged,” performed at the University of Southern Maine and UNH simultaneously through video simulcast and other technologies. His applied theatre work stretches the bounds of theatre further, moving into the realms of social justice and workplace training. For example, Kaye founded Powerplay, a professional company that creates interactive theatre performances for personal and institutional development. PowerPlay has worked with New Hampshire Easter Seals, Primax Incorporated and several programs run by the National Science Foundation. In short, Kaye has been a champion for theatre, working hard to demonstrate that the discipline is exciting and relevant not only in the Paul Creative Arts Center but also in many other areas of our culture.

Professor Kaye’s commitment to theatre pedagogy registers loudly with his students. With enthusiasm, patience and sensitivity, he challenges them to take big risks and be courageous. Students accept the challenge and recognize its value. What comes through in their testimony about Professor Kaye’s teaching is that his lessons in the classroom are really lessons about life. One student sums up the sentiment: “He taught me things this semester that will forever change the way I approach performing and even everyday life.” Professor Kaye has been recognized for his outstanding work with students on multiple occasions. In 2009, he won both a UNH Excellence in Teaching Award and the Leonidas A. Nickole Theatre Educator of the Year Award from the New England Theatre Conference. He won the University Social Justice Award in 2010 and the Outstanding Associate Professor Award in 2012.

Professor Kaye has demonstrated that he possesses the highest qualities of scholarship and teaching and is most deserving of the Lindberg Award.

The annual Gary Lindberg Award was established by the College of Liberal Arts in 1986 in memory of Professor Gary Lindberg of the Department of English. Professor Lindberg was an exceptional scholar and outstanding teacher whose dedication and service to the University of New Hampshire as well as the wider community exemplified the highest academic standards and ideals. In memory of Professor Lindberg and as a means of publicly supporting superior faculty accomplishment, the College of Liberal Arts annually recognizes one truly outstanding scholar and teacher within the College. The recipient is invited to present the Lindberg Lecture to the public during the following academic year.


David Kaye Brought Peace to Middle East

October 15, 2015

David Kaye

Well, he tried anyway. In 2011, UNH theatre professor David Kaye packed up his wife and two young daughters and headed to Israel intent on achieving the unachievable: Peace in the Middle East. With rockets flying and his family kvetching, you will see the true story of a man’s optimism put to the ultimate test in Kaye’s one-man tragicomedy, “How I Brought Peace to the Middle East,” both written and performed by Kaye, who will take you along on his many misadventures from Vermont to the Holy Land. 

Performances of “How I Brought Peace to the Middle East,” will take place on Friday, October 16 at 8 p.m. and Saturday, October 17 at 2 and 8 p.m. at the West End Studio Theatre in Portsmouth, N.H., before the show heads to New York City to be part of the prestigious United Solo theatre festival. Kaye’s festival performance will take place on November 13. United Solo is the world’s largest solo theatre festival, currently in its 6th season. The juried festival opened on September 17 for a ten-week run, featuring 150 solo productions from six continents. All shows are staged at Theatre Row on 42nd Street in New York City.

More information about the upcoming N.H. performances can be found here.

To learn more about the NYC performance, visit the United Solo website.


Theatre and Dance Alum Reunite

November 13, 2014

group photo of alums and faculty

The Department of Theatre and Dance invited alumni back to campus on November 8 for a day of socializing, food, and theatre. The group attended the department’s production of Chicago in the evening. Here, alumni and faculty pose for a shot outside of Huddleston Hall.


Faculty Excellence

April 1, 2014

excellence logo
The University has announced the 2014 winners of the university-wide faculty excellence and teaching awards.

Congratulations to these distinguished faculty members.

Outstanding Assistant Professor
Szu-Feng Chen, Assistant Professor, Department of Theatre and Dance

Distinguished Professor Award
Willem deVries, Professor, Department of Philosophy

Teaching Excellence Award
Joan Glutting, Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology

Teaching Excellence Award
Suzanne Graham, Associate Professor, Department of Education

Excellence in International Engagement Award
Sheila McNamee, Professor, Department of Communication

Teaching Excellence Award
Catherine Moran, Senior Lecturer, Department of Sociology

Award for Excellence in Public Service
Sharyn Potter, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology


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