This Was A Really Bad Idea

October 11, 2016

graphic of David Kaye's face in center of a black hole

David Kaye, UNH professor of theatre, will deliver the College of Liberal Arts Lindberg Lecture entitled “This Was A Really Bad Idea: Life Vs. Theatre and the Creative Abyss.” The lecture will take place on Friday, October 21, from 2:30-3:30 p.m., with a reception from 2:00-2:30 p.m. Both events will be held in Murkland 110.

David Kaye was selected as the 2016 recipient of the Lindberg Award, given annually to the outstanding teacher-scholar in the College of Liberal Arts. Professor Kaye’s scholarly and creative work focuses on acting, directing, playwriting and applied theatre. He deftly produces, directs and performs a wide range of material, from the ancient Greeks to contemporary works, at UNH and for equity and non-equity companies regionally. Professor Kaye’s excellence in the classroom has been recognized with a UNH Excellence in Teaching Award and the Leonidas A. Nickole Theatre Educator of the Year Award from the New England Theatre Conference. He also won the University Social Justice Award in 2010 and the Outstanding Associate Professor Award in 2012.


David Kaye Named 2016 Lindberg Award Recipient

March 2, 2016

David Kaye

David Kaye, professor of theatre, has been selected as the 2016 recipient of the Lindberg Award, given annually to the outstanding teacher-scholar in the College of Liberal Arts.

Professor Kaye earned a B.S. at Castleton State College and an M.F.A. in acting at Brandeis University. He was appointed to the UNH faculty in 1996.

Professor Kaye’s scholarly and creative work focuses on acting, directing, playwriting and applied theatre. He deftly produces, directs and performs a wide range of material, from the ancient Greeks to contemporary works, at UNH and for equity and non-equity companies regionally. As a playwright, Kaye’s most recent endeavor has been a one-man tragi-comedy, which he also performs, titled “How I Brought Peace to the Middle East.” Based on his experiences as a Fulbright Scholar in Israel, the play had two successful runs in Portsmouth and was selected for inclusion in a juried festival of one-person plays on Broadway. Kaye’s innovative work often involves collaboration across cultures, disciplines and even geographic locales, such as his 2013 multi-media production “Estranged,” performed at the University of Southern Maine and UNH simultaneously through video simulcast and other technologies. His applied theatre work stretches the bounds of theatre further, moving into the realms of social justice and workplace training. For example, Kaye founded Powerplay, a professional company that creates interactive theatre performances for personal and institutional development. PowerPlay has worked with New Hampshire Easter Seals, Primax Incorporated and several programs run by the National Science Foundation. In short, Kaye has been a champion for theatre, working hard to demonstrate that the discipline is exciting and relevant not only in the Paul Creative Arts Center but also in many other areas of our culture.

Professor Kaye’s commitment to theatre pedagogy registers loudly with his students. With enthusiasm, patience and sensitivity, he challenges them to take big risks and be courageous. Students accept the challenge and recognize its value. What comes through in their testimony about Professor Kaye’s teaching is that his lessons in the classroom are really lessons about life. One student sums up the sentiment: “He taught me things this semester that will forever change the way I approach performing and even everyday life.” Professor Kaye has been recognized for his outstanding work with students on multiple occasions. In 2009, he won both a UNH Excellence in Teaching Award and the Leonidas A. Nickole Theatre Educator of the Year Award from the New England Theatre Conference. He won the University Social Justice Award in 2010 and the Outstanding Associate Professor Award in 2012.

Professor Kaye has demonstrated that he possesses the highest qualities of scholarship and teaching and is most deserving of the Lindberg Award.

The annual Gary Lindberg Award was established by the College of Liberal Arts in 1986 in memory of Professor Gary Lindberg of the Department of English. Professor Lindberg was an exceptional scholar and outstanding teacher whose dedication and service to the University of New Hampshire as well as the wider community exemplified the highest academic standards and ideals. In memory of Professor Lindberg and as a means of publicly supporting superior faculty accomplishment, the College of Liberal Arts annually recognizes one truly outstanding scholar and teacher within the College. The recipient is invited to present the Lindberg Lecture to the public during the following academic year.


David Kaye Brought Peace to Middle East

October 15, 2015

David Kaye

Well, he tried anyway. In 2011, UNH theatre professor David Kaye packed up his wife and two young daughters and headed to Israel intent on achieving the unachievable: Peace in the Middle East. With rockets flying and his family kvetching, you will see the true story of a man’s optimism put to the ultimate test in Kaye’s one-man tragicomedy, “How I Brought Peace to the Middle East,” both written and performed by Kaye, who will take you along on his many misadventures from Vermont to the Holy Land. 

Performances of “How I Brought Peace to the Middle East,” will take place on Friday, October 16 at 8 p.m. and Saturday, October 17 at 2 and 8 p.m. at the West End Studio Theatre in Portsmouth, N.H., before the show heads to New York City to be part of the prestigious United Solo theatre festival. Kaye’s festival performance will take place on November 13. United Solo is the world’s largest solo theatre festival, currently in its 6th season. The juried festival opened on September 17 for a ten-week run, featuring 150 solo productions from six continents. All shows are staged at Theatre Row on 42nd Street in New York City.

More information about the upcoming N.H. performances can be found here.

To learn more about the NYC performance, visit the United Solo website.


Theatre and Dance Alum Reunite

November 13, 2014

group photo of alums and faculty

The Department of Theatre and Dance invited alumni back to campus on November 8 for a day of socializing, food, and theatre. The group attended the department’s production of Chicago in the evening. Here, alumni and faculty pose for a shot outside of Huddleston Hall.


Faculty Excellence

April 1, 2014

excellence logo
The University has announced the 2014 winners of the university-wide faculty excellence and teaching awards.

Congratulations to these distinguished faculty members.

Outstanding Assistant Professor
Szu-Feng Chen, Assistant Professor, Department of Theatre and Dance

Distinguished Professor Award
Willem deVries, Professor, Department of Philosophy

Teaching Excellence Award
Joan Glutting, Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology

Teaching Excellence Award
Suzanne Graham, Associate Professor, Department of Education

Excellence in International Engagement Award
Sheila McNamee, Professor, Department of Communication

Teaching Excellence Award
Catherine Moran, Senior Lecturer, Department of Sociology

Award for Excellence in Public Service
Sharyn Potter, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology


UNH Tackles Climate Change, Culture Clash With Production of “Sila”

February 18, 2014
Natalie Bujeaud (l) and Melissa Snow (r)

Natalie Bujeaud (l) and Melissa Snow (r)

Opening tomorrow, February 19, “Sila” is the first winning play from the Woodward International Playwriting Competition to be produced by the UNH Department of Theatre and Dance.

“Sila” was selected from more than 149 submissions and written by NYC based Canadian playwright, Chantal Bilodeau. The play examines the competing interests shaping the future of the Canadian Arctic and local Inuit population. Set on Baffin Island in the territory of Nunavut, it follows a climate scientist, an Inuit activist and her daughter, two Canadian Coast Guard officers, an Inuit elder and two polar bears as they see their values challenged and their lives become intricately intertwined. Equal parts Inuit myth and contemporary Arctic policy, “Sila” uses puppetry, projections, spoken word poetry and three different languages; English, French and Inuktitut.

“I have now worked on this play for over a year and a half, and I still love it,” says professor Deb Kinghorn, director of the play. “I love what it says and how it says it. I love that the play is not just about climate change; it is about people coming together, honoring other cultures, respecting nature, and learning that no one has all the answers, which makes sharing and working together vital, if we are to progress without further damage.”

The creative team has invited scientists, activists, and artists to join them on the stage on various evenings to explore the questions raised by “Sila” and to learn what we can do to create the change we wish to see in the world.

“It’s what theatre does best,” says Kinghorn, “and I think we are going to do it well.”

The play runs February 19 – 22 at 7:00 p.m. and February 23 at 2:00 p.m. in the UNH Johnson Theatre. Call 603-862-7222 or visit http://unharts.com for ticket information.

This production is part of Cultural Stages: Woodward International Drama and Dance Initiative, a project funded by Ellis Woodward, UNH Class of ’74.


David Richman awarded Class of 1938 Professorship

April 18, 2013

David Richman
David Richman, Professor of Theatre and Dance, has been selected by the Provost to receive the Class of 1938 Professorship Award. This award recognizes a UNH faculty member for excellence in teaching and provides a discretionary allowance for professional expenses for a three-year term.

With the help of the University of New Hampshire Foundation, UNH initiated the Professorships program in 1990 to help support faculty members in their teaching, public service, and research. The purpose of the program is to help the University be more competitive in hiring new faculty members, reward outstanding academic accomplishments, and enhance the faculty’s opportunities for superior scholarship, innovative teaching, and meaningful service. Professorships are awarded by the provost based on nominations by deans.


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