The Significance of Listening

March 7, 2017

booko cover

Paula M. Salvio, UNH professor of education, and co-authors Bronwen E. Low and Chloe Brushwood Rose, have published a new book titled “Community-based Media Pedagogies: Relational Practices of Listening in the Commons” (Routledge).

“Funded by the Canadian Social Science Humanities Research Council, this comparative study of community media projects began with an interest in the kinds of stories people were telling in community programs through participatory, multimedia forms,” explains Salvio. “What might these stories tell us about the complexities of experiences of migration, marginalization, mobility and identity for their participants?”

Salvio and her colleagues worked with three groups: recently immigrated women in a leadership program in Toronto working with digital storytelling, youth with refugee experience in Montreal who were part of the mappingmemories.ca project, and youth at the Centre for Urban Pedagogy in New York City who use digital media, art and design to make educational tools that demystify complex policy and planning issues in their communities.

“Following our observations, interviews and reflection, we realized that we needed to complement our attention to the experience of storytelling with an examination of listening,” says Salvio. “In the group processes in these and other programs, including ‘story circles,’ one spends far more time listening than speaking. We realized that part of the power of these projects lay in their cultivation of listening relations, which supported participants in taking social and emotional risks. And so we began exploring the pedagogical and social significance of listening, and the role it might play in building a democratic, educational ‘commons,’ by developing a theory of intersubjective listening. This theory moves beyond dialogue to take into consideration the fundamental interdependence of speaker and listener, as well as the political and ethical complexities of such a listening.”

Salvio’s research focuses on the cultural and historical foundations of education with a specialization in psychoanalysis, life-writing and the impact that marginalization, trauma and war have on women, children and youth in formal and informal educational settings.

“Community-based Media Pedagogies: Relational Practices of Listening in the Commons” is now available online and in print.


UNH Anthropologist Receives Fellowship to Establish Museum in Belize

March 3, 2017

photo of Eleanor Harrison-Buck

Eleanor Harrison-Buck, an associate professor of anthropology at UNH, has been awarded a $50,000 Whiting Public Engagement Fellowship to establish a public history museum in Belize that focuses on the Kriol (Creole) community.

More than a third of the population of Belize is part of the Kriol community descended from enslaved Africans brought to the country by Europeans in the 18th and 19th century.

“The legacy of British colonialism in Belize is strong: national school curricula, offerings at the national museum and a booming tourism market all tend to focus on the ancient Maya and colonial periods with little emphasis on the rich history and culture of the Kriol,” said Harrison-Buck. “I’ve conducted archaeological research in Belize for more than 25 years and helped to establish a temporary exhibit on Kriol culture last summer. It’s time there is a permanent record of this community.”

Harrison-Buck will work in collaboration with Kriol community leaders, educators, and local and regional authorities. The new museum, housed in a building donated by the town of Crooked Tree, will include local oral histories, artifacts, images and stories to present the culture to tourists, teachers and students.

Her research focuses on the classic Maya “collapse” period and subsequent Spanish and British colonial periods in Belize. Since 2009 she has directed the Belize River East Archaeology project, examining the history of the eastern watershed from preclassic to colonial times. Through her work she uncovered the history of the Kriol culture and heritage.

The Whiting Public Engagement Fellowship celebrates and supports faculty in the humanities who embrace public engagement as part of the scholarly vocation. She will receive a year-long leave to pursue this public-facing project and has secured external funding from the Alphawood Foundation of Chicago to help support the project costs. Harrison-Buck was one of eight humanities scholars around the country to receive the fellowship. The goal of every Whiting-funded project is to engage a public audience in the richness of the humanities.

Harrison-Buck was also awarded a UNH Center for the Humanities Publicly Engaged Humanities Fellowship for this project.

Source: Release by Erika Mantz, UNH Newsroom


Dress for Success

February 27, 2017

Dress for Success wordmark

COLA Career and Professional Success (CaPS) is supporting a clothing drive to spruce up UNH’s Career Closet! If you have lightly used suits and business attire, please consider donating them during this year’s drive, which runs through March 24. Students use the closet to look their best to attend interviews, conferences, career events and other related activities. Donation bins can be found outside the COLA CaPS office in McConnell Hall, room 102. Thank you!

Questions? Contact raul.bernal@unh.edu.


Mary Schuh Receives Kennedy Public Policy Fellowship

February 23, 2017

photo of Mary Schuh

Mary Schuh, research associate professor of education and director of development and consumer affairs and the National Center on Inclusive Education at the UNH Institute on Disability, received the Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Foundation Public Policy Fellowship. This one-year fellowship is based in Washington, DC and prepares fellows for leadership roles in public policy at the state and national level.

“I welcome the challenge of gaining a deeper understanding of both the politics and the policies impacting the lives of individuals with disabilities and their families,” says Schuh. “The question I will continue to ask is: ‘How best can we preserve and promote innovative public policies that create welcoming and supportive communities?’  I hope to have a role in positively impacting the answer.”

During this one-year fellowship, Schuh will learn how federal legislation is initiated, developed, and passed by Congress, how programs are administered, and regulations promulgated by federal agencies. She will also be involved as the disability community works to shape public policy impacting people with disabilities and their families.

Since its founding in 1946, the Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Foundation has supported the creation of practical programs to benefit persons with intellectual disabilities, their families and their communities.

“I am so grateful to the Joseph P. Kennedy Foundation to have been selected to join the family of Kennedy Fellows and participate in what will probably be one of the most significant learning opportunities of my life,” shares Schuh.

edited from a longer article by Matt Gianino, Institute on Disability


Get to the Greek

February 22, 2017

actors on stage

It’s been 10 years since Greco pillars have graced the Johnson Theatre stage in the way they will this weekend when actors from three University System of New Hampshire schools will stage The Oedipus Cycle: A USNH Collaboration.

Students from Keene State College, Plymouth State University and the University of New Hampshire will bring some of the Greek’s finest characters to life in five separate productions in Durham, starting with UNH’s presentation of  “Oedipus at Colonus” Feb. 22, 23 and 26. PSU will present “Oedipus the King” on Feb. 24, and KSC will stage “Antigone” on Feb. 25. Show times and ticket information

It’s been a decade since the three schools’ theatre departments have collaborated on a Greek trilogy; in 2007, they brought “Electra,” “Women of Troy” and “Agamemnon” to Johnson Theatre. This weekend’s productions celebrate the 10-year anniversary of that collaboration while revisiting the lives of other beloved Greek characters whose timeless stories still resonate.

The UNH troupe will hit the road early next month to bring “Oedipus at Colonus” to KSU audiences March 3 and PSU March 9.

Post written by Tracey Bentley, UNH Communications and Public Affairs.

 


Intern in Italy

February 21, 2017

Caitlin Truesdale

Caitlin Truesdale ’17 of Peabody, Mass., has been accepted into the prestigious and competitive Peggy Guggenheim Internship Program in Venice, Italy. She will work at the Guggenheim Collection in the fall of 2017. Among other duties, Truesdale will help manage the galleries during open hours and participate in educational activities, including public presentations and guided tours.

“Even days after hearing the news, I can’t quite believe I was accepted to the program,” says Truesdale. “Ever since I first heard of the internship my sophomore year from Prof. Boylan, I knew it was something I wanted to do. As a double major in art history and Italian studies, I feel it is a wonderful meeting of my passions, and the perfect way to utilize my education in life post-grad.”

Truesdale is currently a fellowship student at the UNH Museum of Art, an experience she says has solidified her desire to pursue a career in museums.

“Where better to continue my journey than the Guggenheim in Venice?” she asks. “This will give me an opportunity to improve not only my fluency in Italian, but my knowledge of the modern art world in such a fantastic and unique way, not to mention the excitement of traveling the world on my own!”

The Peggy Guggenheim Collection is one of Europe’s premier museums devoted to modern art. At the core of the museum’s holdings is Peggy Guggenheim’s personal collection of 20th-century art comprised of masterpieces ranging in style from Cubism and Surrealism to Abstract Expressionism.


New Grant Supports N.H. Early Childhood STEM Teachers

February 20, 2017

teacher with student

The University of New Hampshire was awarded a $200,000 grant from 100Kin10, the national network that aims to train and retain 100,000 excellent K-12 STEM teachers by 2021. The award will support an online professional development program for pre-K to third grade math teachers in New Hampshire.

“We are so excited for this opportunity to collaborate with the UNH Leitzel Center, the state Department of Education, New Hampshire teachers of mathematics and 100Kin10 to support pre-K to third grade teachers throughout all of New Hampshire in their teaching of mathematics,” says Diane Silva Pimentel, assistant professor of education in UNH’s College of Liberal Arts. “We will work hard to establish a statewide network where teachers and organizations committed to improving mathematics education can engage in vital discussions and learning related to preparing young children to be successful in mathematics. We see this as another step in our long-term commitment to the teachers and students of New Hampshire.”

The three main components of the two-year project are online coursework and professional learning community participation focused on both pedagogy and content, on-site coaching, and a yearly summit that includes professional development and time for teachers across grade levels and school sites to collaborate. The project will be led by Pimentel along with Karen Graham and Sheree Sharpe in mathematics and Brandie Bolduc in education.

“To better prepare all students to solve the world’s most pressing problems, we need to help teachers deliver STEM content in active ways that support their students’ creative use of this knowledge,” said 100Kin10 Executive Director Talia Milgrom-Elcott.

The UNH initiative is one of 10 projects supported by 100Kin10 this year as part of their Early Childhood STEM Learning Challenge, a commitment to encourage the use of design thinking and solutions from outside fields to solve complex problems in STEM education.


%d bloggers like this: