2017 in Books

December 22, 2017

3 book covers

Faculty members in the College of Liberal Arts published a range of books this year, shedding light on Hollywood’s fascination with Hawaii, the history of credit bureaus such as Equifax, and the intersection of public health and democracy, among other topics. Here’s the roundup.

book coverLGBTQ Politics: A Critical Reader
edited by Marla Brettschneider, Susan Burgess and Christine Keating
NYU Press; Critical edition (September 19, 2017)
book coverQueer, Latinx, and Bilingual: Narrative Resources in the Negotiation of Identities
by Holly R. Cashman
Routledge Critical Studies in Multilingualism Series
Routledge (November 15, 2017)
book coverHealth and Freedom in the Balance: Exploring the Tensions among Public Health, Individual Liberty, and Governmental Authority
edited by M. Girard Dorsey and Rosemary M. Caron
Public Health in the 21st Century Series
Nova Science Publishers, Inc. (July 2017)
book coverA Dictionary of Literary Symbols, Third Edition
by Michael Ferber
Cambridge University Press; 3 edition (May 27, 2017)
book coverHollywood’s Hawaii: Race, Nation, and War
by Delia Malia Caparoso Konzett
War Culture Series
Rutgers University Press (March 1, 2017)
book coverCarl Wilhelm Frölich’s “On Man and his Circumstances:” A Translation of “Über den Menschen und seine Verhältnisse”
translated, with introduction, by Edward T. Larkin
Peter Lang (May 29, 2017)
book coverCreditworthy: A History of Consumer Surveillance and Financial Identity in America
by Josh Lauer
Columbia Studies in the History of U.S. Capitalism Series
Columbia University Press (July 25, 2017)
book coverMinimum Contract Justice: A Capabilities Perspective on Sweatshops and Consumer Contracts
by Lyn K. L. Tjon Soei Len
Hart Publishing (May 4, 2017)
book coverWriting across Culture and Language: Inclusive Strategies for Working with ELL Writers in the ELA Classroom
by Christina Ortmeier-Hooper
National Council of Teachers of English (November 6, 2017)
book coverLinguistically Diverse Immigrant and Resident Writers: Transitions from High School to College
edited by Christina Ortmeier-Hooper and Todd Ruecker
ESL & Applied Linguistics Professional Series
Routledge (2017)
book coverThe Story-Takers: Public Pedagogy, Transitional Justice, and Italy’s Non-Violent Protest against the Mafia
by Paula M. Salvio
University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division (November 6, 2017)
book coverMarijuana: Examining the Facts
by Karen T. Van Gundy and Michael S. Staunton
Contemporary Debates Series
ABC-CLIO (August 2, 2017)

New Book Examines Hollywood’s Hawaii

April 3, 2017

book cover

Delia Malia Caparoso Konzett has published the first full-length study of the American film industry’s fascination with the Pacific in “Hollywood’s Hawaii: Race, Nation, and War.” The book is part of the War Culture Series from Rutgers University Press.

“Hollywood’s Hawaii” presents a history of cinema from 1898 to present that examines Hawaii and the Pacific and its representation in film in the context of colonialism, war, Orientalism, occupation, military buildup and entertainment.

“My family is from Hawaii and I’ve grown up in Hawaii partially,” says Konzett. “For my family, the representation of Hawaii in Hollywood always appeared at odds with the reality of our experiences. This discrepancy stirred my curiosity about Hollywood films set in the Pacific. My father, who also served in the military, steered my interest towards Pacific war films and I began to see two identities that Hollywood attached to Hawaii, namely a leisure paradise and a geopolitical site of military interest. My book tries to explore this complex relation between two seemingly contradictory identities and its relevance for the national imagination and its representation in Hollywood film.”

In “Hollywood’s Hawaii,” Konzett highlights films that mirror the cultural and political climate of the country — from the era of U.S. imperialism through Jim Crow racial segregation, the attack on Pearl Harbor and WWII, the civil rights movement, the contemporary articulation of consumer and leisure culture, as well as the buildup of the modern military industrial complex.

Gary Y. Okihiro, author of “Island World: Hawai`i and the United States,” writes of Konzett’s book:A marvelously comprehensive gaze at cinematic representations of Hawaii, this insightful study shows how those fictions constitute and are constituted by U.S. imperialism, Christian capitalism and white nationalism. Moreover, the imagined South Pacific is not a distant, fleeting pleasure but an imminent, durable presence.”

Konzett is associate professor of English, cinema and women’s studies at UNH. She is the author of “Ethnic Modernisms: Anzia Yezierska, Zora Neale Hurston, Jean Rhys, and the Aesthetics of Location” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2002).

“Hollywood’s Hawaii” is available from the publisher and major online retailers.

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