UNH Psychologist Katie Edwards Receives Early Career Award

September 7, 2016

photo of Katie Edwards

Assistant professor of psychology Katie Edwards has received the 2016 Louise Kidder Early Career Award from The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. The selection committee cited Edwards’s commitment to both science and advocacy, and her work with underrepresented and marginalized groups as particularly impressive. They noted Edwards’s extensive record of publications and presentations, as well as her leadership at the state and national level on issues of sexual violence.

Edwards’s interdisciplinary program of research focuses broadly on better understanding the causes and consequences of interpersonal violence, primarily intimate partner violence and sexual assault among adolescents and young adults. Edwards uses this research data to develop, implement and evaluate prevention, intervention and policy efforts.

The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues is a group of over 3000 scientists from psychology and related fields who share a common interest in research on the psychological aspects of social and policy issues. The independent Society is also a division of the American Psychological Association.


Katie Edwards Named APA Contributing Editor of the Year

November 18, 2015

Katie Edwards

Assistant Professor of Psychology Katie Edwards has been named the Contributing Editor of the Year 2015 by the American Psychological Association (APA) for the journal “Psychology of Violence.” The honor recognizes outstanding contributions by an ad-hoc reviewer based on the quality, quantity and timeliness of reviews.

“Psychology of Violence” is a multidisciplinary research journal devoted to violence and extreme aggression, including identifying the causes of violence from a psychological framework, finding ways to prevent or reduce violence, and developing practical interventions and treatments.

Edwards’s research focuses on predictors and correlates of intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization, perpetration, and bystander intervention among adolescents and young adults; leaving processes in relationships characterized by IPV; disclosure of IPV experiences and social reactions to these disclosures; and ethics of IPV research.


UNH Receives Grant to Examine How Communities Build Capacity to Prevent Violence

September 23, 2015

Researchers at the Prevention Innovations Research Center at UNH will study how people in communities work together to address violence thanks to a $1.6 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The researchers will evaluate prevention strategies developed by GreenDot, Etc, an organization that provides training and resources necessary to support individuals, institutions and communities in reducing power-based personal violence.

“The study will help us better understand how to assist broader communities, not just schools or campuses, to work together to address complicated problems like interpersonal violence. We know much more about changing people individually than about what moves communities forward as a whole,” said Vicki Banyard, professor of psychology and principal investigator on the grant.

Research on violence prevention has often looked at the impact of classroom or workshop-based strategies. There are a number of programs that show promise in changing the attitudes and behaviors of groups of students using these approaches. But research is also clear that characteristics of communities where those individuals live and work and study are also related to how people think about problems like violence. “We know from research that feeling close to and mattering to people in one’s community is related to lower rates of violence. It is exciting to be translating this research into community-based practice and action,” says Katie Edwards, assistant professor of psychology and women’s studies and an investigator on the grant. “We know that interpersonal violence is a complex problem that will take more than one tool to solve,” says Banyard. “It is time to take prevention to the next level and add community work to our toolkit.”

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