Outstanding Teacher and Scholar

March 20, 2017

photo of Ellen Fitzpatrick

Ellen Fitzpatrick, professor of history, has been selected as the 2017 recipient of the Lindberg Award, given annually to the outstanding teacher-scholar in the College of Liberal Arts.

Professor Fitzpatrick was appointed to the UNH faculty in 1997 as associate professor after serving eight years on the faculty of Harvard. She previously taught at MIT and Wellesley. She earned her Ph.D. at Brandeis.

Professor Fitzpatrick specializes in modern American political and intellectual history. She is the author or editor of nine books. Her most recent book, “The Highest Glass Ceiling: Women’s Quest for the American Presidency” (Harvard UP, 2016) was excerpted in The New Yorker, selected as an Editor’s Choice by the New York Times and named a notable nonfiction book of 2016 by the Washington Post. Her previous book, “Letters to Jackie: Condolences from a Grieving Nation” (Ecco, 2010), was a New York Times bestseller and the basis of a highly regarded documentary film by Bill Couturie entitled “Letters to Jackie: Remembering President Kennedy.” Professor Fitzpatrick served as associate producer.

Professor Fitzpatrick’s recent scholarship has had broad public appeal, and she has fully embraced the role of public intellectual. She has been interviewed as an expert on modern American political history by the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, USA Today, the Boston Globe, the Washington Post, CBS’s Face the Nation, National Public Radio and has appeared frequently on the PBS News Hour. Within the last year, she has contributed opinion pieces to the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times and CNN online. Additionally, she is an active public speaker at museums, universities and other venues. In recognition of her tireless contributions to public discourse, she is a past recipient of UNH’s Award for Excellence in Public Service.

In addition to her vigorous scholarly activities, Professor Fitzpatrick dedicates herself every year to first-year students, expertly guiding them through a survey of modern U.S. history course, and to budding historians in the major gateway course. She is equally adept at teaching upper-level undergraduate and graduate seminars, as well as directing a number of theses and dissertations. According to colleagues, she is a creative and caring teacher, remembered by students, even many years later, for her particular eloquence and deep knowledge.

The annual Gary Lindberg Award was established by the College of Liberal Arts in 1986 in memory of Professor Gary Lindberg of the Department of English. As a means of publicly supporting superior faculty accomplishment, the College of Liberal Arts annually recognizes one truly outstanding scholar and teacher within the College. The recipient is invited to present a lecture to the public during the following academic year.


David Kaye Named 2016 Lindberg Award Recipient

March 2, 2016

David Kaye

David Kaye, professor of theatre, has been selected as the 2016 recipient of the Lindberg Award, given annually to the outstanding teacher-scholar in the College of Liberal Arts.

Professor Kaye earned a B.S. at Castleton State College and an M.F.A. in acting at Brandeis University. He was appointed to the UNH faculty in 1996.

Professor Kaye’s scholarly and creative work focuses on acting, directing, playwriting and applied theatre. He deftly produces, directs and performs a wide range of material, from the ancient Greeks to contemporary works, at UNH and for equity and non-equity companies regionally. As a playwright, Kaye’s most recent endeavor has been a one-man tragi-comedy, which he also performs, titled “How I Brought Peace to the Middle East.” Based on his experiences as a Fulbright Scholar in Israel, the play had two successful runs in Portsmouth and was selected for inclusion in a juried festival of one-person plays on Broadway. Kaye’s innovative work often involves collaboration across cultures, disciplines and even geographic locales, such as his 2013 multi-media production “Estranged,” performed at the University of Southern Maine and UNH simultaneously through video simulcast and other technologies. His applied theatre work stretches the bounds of theatre further, moving into the realms of social justice and workplace training. For example, Kaye founded Powerplay, a professional company that creates interactive theatre performances for personal and institutional development. PowerPlay has worked with New Hampshire Easter Seals, Primax Incorporated and several programs run by the National Science Foundation. In short, Kaye has been a champion for theatre, working hard to demonstrate that the discipline is exciting and relevant not only in the Paul Creative Arts Center but also in many other areas of our culture.

Professor Kaye’s commitment to theatre pedagogy registers loudly with his students. With enthusiasm, patience and sensitivity, he challenges them to take big risks and be courageous. Students accept the challenge and recognize its value. What comes through in their testimony about Professor Kaye’s teaching is that his lessons in the classroom are really lessons about life. One student sums up the sentiment: “He taught me things this semester that will forever change the way I approach performing and even everyday life.” Professor Kaye has been recognized for his outstanding work with students on multiple occasions. In 2009, he won both a UNH Excellence in Teaching Award and the Leonidas A. Nickole Theatre Educator of the Year Award from the New England Theatre Conference. He won the University Social Justice Award in 2010 and the Outstanding Associate Professor Award in 2012.

Professor Kaye has demonstrated that he possesses the highest qualities of scholarship and teaching and is most deserving of the Lindberg Award.

The annual Gary Lindberg Award was established by the College of Liberal Arts in 1986 in memory of Professor Gary Lindberg of the Department of English. Professor Lindberg was an exceptional scholar and outstanding teacher whose dedication and service to the University of New Hampshire as well as the wider community exemplified the highest academic standards and ideals. In memory of Professor Lindberg and as a means of publicly supporting superior faculty accomplishment, the College of Liberal Arts annually recognizes one truly outstanding scholar and teacher within the College. The recipient is invited to present the Lindberg Lecture to the public during the following academic year.


Historian Jeff Bolster Named 2015 Lindberg Award Winner

February 27, 2015

Jeff Bolster

Dean Kenneth Fuld is delighted to announce that W. Jeffrey Bolster, Professor of History, has been selected as the 2015 recipient of the Lindberg Award, given annually to the outstanding teacher-scholar in the College of Liberal Arts.

Professor Bolster earned his undergraduate degree at Trinity College (Hartford), his M.A. from Brown, and his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins. He was appointed to the UNH faculty in 1991. His research encompasses maritime history, African-American history, environmental history, and Atlantic history. He not only reads and writes about oceans, but also sails them. He spent a decade as master and mate of sailing school-ships and research vessels in the Atlantic, and he’s currently licensed by the U.S. Coast Guard as both master and mate of a variety of sailing vessels.

Professor Bolster has written four books on maritime history that have garnered some of the most prestigious awards the field has to offer. His most recent book, The Mortal Sea: Fishing the Atlantic in the Age of Sail (Harvard UP, 2012), won the 2013 Bancroft Prize, the North American Society for Oceanic History’s John Lyman Book Award for the best book in U.S. Maritime History, the American Historical Association’s 2013 Albert J. Beveridge Prize, and the American Historical Association’s 2013 James Rawley Prize in Atlantic History. His 1997 book, Black Jacks: African American Seamen in the Age of Sail (Harvard UP), won The New York Times Book Review notable book of the year, the Wesley-Logan Prize of the American Historical Association, and the Association of American Publishers Professional and Scholarly Publishing Division Best Book in History.

Recognition of Professor Bolster’s work extends to the popular press. The Mortal Sea was reviewed by major national and international outlets, and, just last month, Professor Bolster was commissioned by The New York Times to write a related editorial. He’s served as public intellectual in film and television, appearing on PBS’s Columbus and the Age of Discovery, BBC’s Horizon, NBC’s Revenge of the Whale, and Discovery Channel’s Slave Ship, as well as twice providing coverage of the Tall Ships in Boston event for New England Cable Network. Black Jacks sold briskly in commercial bookstores and had a major impact on a former Virginia prison inmate who credits the book with turning his life around—the subject of both a Washington Post article and an NEH short film. Professor and Chair of History Eliga Gould notes, “Most historians can only dream of having that kind of impact on readers.”

His UNH students register the positive impact Professor Bolster makes in the classroom. Many doctoral students he mentored have gone on to build highly successful careers in history. One notes that Professor Bolster offered him extraordinary opportunities during which he made some of his most important professional connections and produced some of his best publications: “[Professor Bolster] consistently created situations where I could work on my own scholarship to produce the best results.” Undergraduate students, too, have high praise for Professor Bolster, who teaches a number of 400-level surveys as well as advanced courses in maritime and environmental history. A physics major in a Discovery course said, “I was encouraged to do good work not only for a grade, but to hear his feedback . . . Professor Bolster always displayed a personal interest in the progress of each student.”

Professor Bolster has demonstrated that he possesses the highest qualities of scholarship and teaching and is most deserving of the Lindberg Award.

The annual Gary Lindberg Award was established by the College of Liberal Arts in 1986 in memory of Professor Gary Lindberg of the Department of English. Professor Lindberg was an exceptional scholar and outstanding teacher whose dedication and service to the University of New Hampshire as well as the wider community exemplified the highest academic standards and ideals. In memory of Professor Lindberg and as a means of publicly supporting superior faculty accomplishment, the College of Liberal Arts annually recognizes one truly outstanding scholar and teacher within the College.


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