New Grant Supports N.H. Early Childhood STEM Teachers

February 20, 2017

teacher with student

The University of New Hampshire was awarded a $200,000 grant from 100Kin10, the national network that aims to train and retain 100,000 excellent K-12 STEM teachers by 2021. The award will support an online professional development program for pre-K to third grade math teachers in New Hampshire.

“We are so excited for this opportunity to collaborate with the UNH Leitzel Center, the state Department of Education, New Hampshire teachers of mathematics and 100Kin10 to support pre-K to third grade teachers throughout all of New Hampshire in their teaching of mathematics,” says Diane Silva Pimentel, assistant professor of education in UNH’s College of Liberal Arts. “We will work hard to establish a statewide network where teachers and organizations committed to improving mathematics education can engage in vital discussions and learning related to preparing young children to be successful in mathematics. We see this as another step in our long-term commitment to the teachers and students of New Hampshire.”

The three main components of the two-year project are online coursework and professional learning community participation focused on both pedagogy and content, on-site coaching, and a yearly summit that includes professional development and time for teachers across grade levels and school sites to collaborate. The project will be led by Pimentel along with Karen Graham and Sheree Sharpe in mathematics and Brandie Bolduc in education.

“To better prepare all students to solve the world’s most pressing problems, we need to help teachers deliver STEM content in active ways that support their students’ creative use of this knowledge,” said 100Kin10 Executive Director Talia Milgrom-Elcott.

The UNH initiative is one of 10 projects supported by 100Kin10 this year as part of their Early Childhood STEM Learning Challenge, a commitment to encourage the use of design thinking and solutions from outside fields to solve complex problems in STEM education.


Become a STEM Teacher in Rural N.H. Schools

December 19, 2016

students in classroom

Ever thought about becoming a teacher? UNH is recruiting individuals interested in teaching in rural N.H. schools with a background in math or science but who do not yet have a teaching credential for the new Teacher Residency for Rural Education Program (TRRE).

TRRE is a 15-month teacher residency program that prepares high quality teachers in either elementary or secondary education math or science. During their first summer, residents will take graduate coursework, observe in schools, and complete a community-based internship to learn about the resources of the communities in which they will teach. During the academic year, residents will complete a yearlong “residency” alongside an experienced master teacher in an elementary, middle, or high school classroom.

Residents receive a living wage to support their learning while earning a master’s degree and teacher certification. In addition, during the first two years as a new teacher, Residents receive ongoing support and professional development. Residents commit to teach in rural high need N.H. schools for three years following graduation.

The first cohort begins May 2017. An undergraduate degree in either a math or science discipline is recommended but not required. Those with related backgrounds may still be eligible. Students who plan to earn their bachelor’s degrees in May ’17 are eligible.

Interested individuals should contact Leslie Couse (Leslie.Couse@unh.edu) for further information.


UNH Hosts Prominent Higher Ed Leader Freeman Hrabowski on Oct. 30

October 23, 2014

Freeman Hrabowski photo

Freeman A. Hrabowski III, president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), will speak at UNH on Thursday, October 30, at noon in the Huddleston Ballroom. The event is free and open to the public. His talk, “The Humanities, the Public University, and Public Good,” is the keynote address of a series of lectures this fall that examines the state of the humanities in society and on college campuses.

Hrabowski’s research and publications focus on science and math education, with a special emphasis on minority participation and performance. Though a vocal proponent of education in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), he has spoken nationally—and compellingly—about the importance of the humanities.

“As a STEM person, as someone deeply involved in issues of minority students’ involvement in higher education, as someone who as a child was a leader in the civil rights movement, and as someone who is not a ‘humanities insider,’ Dr. Hrabowski seems uniquely qualified to help us think about the value and importance of what we do,” says Burt Feintuch, professor of English and director of the Center for Humanities, which is organizing this event. “Having someone from outside of our fields talk about their value is especially meaningful. I think his talk will be provocative in the best possible sense of that word.”

Hrabowski was recently named by President Obama to chair the newly created President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans. He also chaired the National Academies’ committee that produced the recent report, Expanding Underrepresented Minority Participation: America’s Science and Technology Talent at the Crossroads. Named one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World by TIME (2012) and one of America’s Best Leaders by U.S. News & World Report (2008), Hrabowski also received TIAA-CREF’s Theodore M. Hesburgh Award for Leadership Excellence (2011), the Carnegie Corporation’s Academic Leadership Award (2011), and the Heinz Award (2012) for contributions to improving the human condition. UMBC has been recognized as a model for academic innovation and inclusive excellence by such publications as U.S. News, which for the past six years has ranked UMBC as the #1 “Up and Coming” university in the nation.

For more information, contact the UNH Center for the Humanities.


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